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Messages - Shackeng

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ... 479
1
Omega General Help / Re: Why are Omega wheels so hard to balance?
« on: 18 October 2018, 19:39:28 »
Yes mate thatís what I thought!

Precision Welding said this is easy for them. £35 a wheel 👍

For balancing? :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o

2
General Discussion Area / Re: Paddington 24
« on: 18 October 2018, 19:34:54 »
Doncha just love the thread drifts on this forum. :y :y :y

3
General Car Chat / Re: How stable is your Omega in the rain
« on: 18 October 2018, 19:32:56 »
It's worth remembering the aquaplaning formula; 9 x √P (P= tyre pressure), so for 36PSI your aquaplaning speed ~
54mph. :y
This will vary from tyre to tyre, but is a useful rough guide. :y
Does depth of water have any bearing on that equation? :-[

Depth of water vs depth/type of tread will clearly make a difference. If the tyre is able to disperse the water such that it is in firm contact with concrete/tarmac W.H.Y., it will not aquaplane so easily.
Dragslicks on 1" of water..... :-X
It is just a useful guide, such that if, for example, you know your tyres are down to minimums, you may expect to aquaplane at the appropriate speed in very heavy rain. HTH
It was not uncommon with A/C tyres, after landing in heavy rain, to discover the occasional patch of 'boiled' rubber on the tread. IIRC the Tristar tyre pressures were about 180psi giving an aquaplaning speed of 120 mph, while landing speed was about 140mph.:y

4
General Car Chat / Re: How stable is your Omega in the rain
« on: 18 October 2018, 15:40:12 »
It's worth remembering the aquaplaning formula; 9 x √P (P= tyre pressure), so for 36PSI your aquaplaning speed ~
54mph. :y
This will vary from tyre to tyre, but is a useful rough guide. :y

5
General Discussion Area / Re: Conservatory roof.
« on: 18 October 2018, 15:28:13 »
This is the first conservatory we've had , only been in the house for 7 weeks but at the moment we love it got cane type table & chairs & cane sofa & chairs eat meals out there listen to music etc. Guy at work was quoted £6000 to have a "proper" roof put on his declined the offer.

Cheers for that. I might get a quote just for a laugh. We do use it in the winter, particularly with dinner guests, but I'm just so mean I hate turning the heating on. Mind you, I get free electricity from my solar panels, so the underfloor costs very little, and a fan heater warms it very quickly. 8)

Get a radiator fitted thatís on main house feed, thatís what I did. Helps a lot.  :y
In the link Aaron posted, it says the heating system should be independent and separately controlled.  :-\

Yes, that is the main issue with mine as the -although very large - rads are at the end of a system which had already been extended, and which is why I put in the very efficient underfloor heating as well. It is quite easyfor me to keep it warm in winter, I just object to losing so much heat through the roof. However, I expect we will put up with it, as it is on the East end of the house, it only needs a little sun AM/early PM to be very comfortable. :y

6
General Discussion Area / Re: Conservatory roof.
« on: 18 October 2018, 10:40:17 »
Firstly, you cant fit a 'proper' roof as the structure is not able to take the associated loads.

Generally what appears to be done is that Celotex (or equivalent) is fitted to the under side using wooden battens and then plaster boarded over, some also then add a light weight roof covering (shingles or similar, I Have seen concrete tiles used but these would be way to heavy, even with Marley lights).

I do have some concerns with this as the upper side of the insulation will attract condensation and there is no ventilation in this part.

Either way, no matter what you do its going to be a compromise.

(I to hate conservatories, a plastic shed with lots of glass which still has to have an external door between it and the house its to big a compromise)
Presumably you mean on security grounds. I have to say that the doors into and out of ours are as equally as secure as our patio doors on the other end of the house, with all the current standard  triple locking etc.  :y

7
General Discussion Area / Re: Conservatory roof.
« on: 18 October 2018, 10:36:36 »
This is the first conservatory we've had , only been in the house for 7 weeks but at the moment we love it got cane type table & chairs & cane sofa & chairs eat meals out there listen to music etc. Guy at work was quoted £6000 to have a "proper" roof put on his declined the offer.

Cheers for that. I might get a quote just for a laugh. We do use it in the winter, particularly with dinner guests, but I'm just so mean I hate turning the heating on. Mind you, I get free electricity from my solar panels, so the underfloor costs very little, and a fan heater warms it very quickly. 8)

Get a radiator fitted thatís on main house feed, thatís what I did. Helps a lot.  :y

See #7. Two built in from main CH.

8
General Discussion Area / Re: Mr Kashoggiís last moments
« on: 17 October 2018, 22:18:47 »
I'm just waiting for the stitch-up which is being arranged between Trump, MbS and Erdogan, and will watch with interest what poor Saudi sap is chosen to be the fall-guy. Probably the Consul-General. :y

9
General Discussion Area / Re: Conservatory roof.
« on: 17 October 2018, 22:16:04 »
This is the first conservatory we've had , only been in the house for 7 weeks but at the moment we love it got cane type table & chairs & cane sofa & chairs eat meals out there listen to music etc. Guy at work was quoted £6000 to have a "proper" roof put on his declined the offer.

Cheers for that. I might get a quote just for a laugh. We do use it in the winter, particularly with dinner guests, but I'm just so mean I hate turning the heating on. Mind you, I get free electricity from my solar panels, so the underfloor costs very little, and a fan heater warms it very quickly. 8)

10
General Car Chat / Re: So what have you done to your car today?
« on: 17 October 2018, 19:09:57 »
A bit of cleaning and light restoration work on the mighty C90. Tried to work out if there was any way of attaching a fireblade engine to the frame, but I think that's a non starter.  :D

Pop one of these in, great for shopping. :y

http://www.nationalmcmuseum.org/plymouth-monster-and-bonneville-in-1935-one-mans-dream-for-the-worlds-fastest-motorcycle/

11
General Discussion Area / Re: Conservatory roof.
« on: 17 October 2018, 19:00:07 »
I have a conservatory, I insulated the walls etc l, with kingspan stuff, added proper radiator.

Problem is conservatoryís are shite, foundations tend to be crap and floor is not insulated either. Itís like trying to heat a kitchen cullender.

Iím now favouring bulldozing it and building a proper extension.

Mine has proper foundations, 100mm insulated floor, underfloor heating, and radiators, (I was site foreman), but of course still loses heat through the double glazing. There are several companies offering either internal, effectively, ceilings, or external insulated roof panels. :y

Sounds better than mine then, I did look at replacement roofs either whole and tiled type or panels. Mine is double glazed roof.

Seriously expensive for what they are, If foundations are strong enough it would probably be similar price to build normal extension, they are that pricey!

Conservatories should be banned in my view, horrible things. Hate mine with a passion.

We love ours, it has a seating area and a dining area for 6, and is well used. A mirror image of this: http://www.vivaldi-conservatories.co.uk/images/pshapeimages/p_shape_conservatory_winter.jpg
 :y

12
Newbie Welcome Area / Re: Hi all.
« on: 17 October 2018, 18:42:50 »
Those look like the original alloys, as I had on my '99 MFL TD. Didn't like them though, and swapped as soon as.  Also they were difficult to clean properly.
Nice looking car. :y
I must agree about the looks, I preferred the dash etc. on my MFL to the one on my FL. :y

13
General Discussion Area / Re: Conservatory roof.
« on: 17 October 2018, 15:10:54 »
Does anyone have knowledge or experience of the various systems offered for insulating conservatory rooves?
Roofs.

Mr Shackeng was a pilot for forty years. He won't take kindly to being lectured on the finer points of spelling and punctuation by an errant scouser. :)

Please do NOT insult the honorable gentleman ... he never was past of the "drivers, airframe, for the use of" branch of Her Majesty's Royal Air Force ..... please note his screenname .. shackENG ....

However as a Master Engineer of some seniority he would have often taught junior pilots the intricacies of correct Service Writing ... 

 :D :D :D

Correct. :y

Among the duties of a Warrant Officer, From the Manual of Air Force Law: IIRC ...advise and instruct Junior Officers. ::)

14
General Discussion Area / Re: Conservatory roof.
« on: 16 October 2018, 22:23:35 »
I have a conservatory, I insulated the walls etc l, with kingspan stuff, added proper radiator.

Problem is conservatoryís are shite, foundations tend to be crap and floor is not insulated either. Itís like trying to heat a kitchen cullender.

Iím now favouring bulldozing it and building a proper extension.

Mine has proper foundations, 100mm insulated floor, underfloor heating, and radiators, (I was site foreman), but of course still loses heat through the double glazing. There are several companies offering either internal, effectively, ceilings, or external insulated roof panels. :y

15
General Discussion Area / Re: Conservatory roof.
« on: 16 October 2018, 22:20:23 »

Sorry, Chris, I forgot your were in your nineties.  ;D

0uchh :(

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