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Author Topic: Lidl customer service  (Read 844 times)

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Tilbo

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Re: Lidl customer service
« Reply #15 on: 09 February 2018, 17:32:40 »

The ones who mis-lead and try and fob their customers off are the ones  who will eventually expire. ;)

Sadly I think your faith in the general public is somewhat misplaced here. There is a great swathe of the populous for whom price is the only metric which is of interest.

The best example of this mentality is Ryanair. An awful vile little company who make a perennial game of d!cking their customers around and providing the most woeful experience possible, not to mention doing their level best to dodge their legal responsibilities (specifically EU Regulation 261/2004 on delayed flights - for which they seldom if ever pay out without a fight), and yet they flourish.  ::)

 
.   Flown with Ryanair once only because a pal had booked all flights , would never under any circumstances use them again dreadful from start to finish.
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Lizzie Zoom

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Re: Lidl customer service
« Reply #16 on: 09 February 2018, 18:08:48 »

Thanks you two....perfect answers to my question :y :y
I fully understand now. :)

Pleased to be of (Customer) service terbert!  :D:y :y
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Lizzie Zoom

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Re: Lidl customer service
« Reply #17 on: 09 February 2018, 18:14:14 »

The ones who mis-lead and try and fob their customers off are the ones  who will eventually expire. ;)

Sadly I think your faith in the general public is somewhat misplaced here. There is a great swathe of the populous for whom price is the only metric which is of interest.

The best example of this mentality is Ryanair. An awful vile little company who make a perennial game of d!cking their customers around and providing the most woeful experience possible, not to mention doing their level best to dodge their legal responsibilities (specifically EU Regulation 261/2004 on delayed flights - for which they seldom if ever pay out without a fight), and yet they flourish.  ::)

 
.   Flown with Ryanair once only because a pal had booked all flights , would never under any circumstances use them again dreadful from start to finish.

They are heading on the road to ruin.

I once told MFI staff (remember them) that they would be losing their jobs if they carried on with their extremely poor levels of customer service after I, and a quite a few other customers were complaining at the same time in one of their stores.  They laughed in my face, but eventually they went bust and I laughed!! ;D ;D ;)  Ryanair is one of those flawed companies going towards the chop ;)
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ronnyd

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Re: Lidl customer service
« Reply #18 on: 09 February 2018, 18:19:43 »

The ones who mis-lead and try and fob their customers off are the ones  who will eventually expire. ;)

Sadly I think your faith in the general public is somewhat misplaced here. There is a great swathe of the populous for whom price is the only metric which is of interest.

The best example of this mentality is Ryanair. An awful vile little company who make a perennial game of d!cking their customers around and providing the most woeful experience possible, not to mention doing their level best to dodge their legal responsibilities (specifically EU Regulation 261/2004 on delayed flights - for which they seldom if ever pay out without a fight), and yet they flourish.  ::)

 
Flown with Ryanair once only because a pal had booked all flights , would never under any circumstances use them again dreadful from start to finish.
I,ve been very lucky then.
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Doctor Gollum

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Re: Lidl customer service
« Reply #19 on: 09 February 2018, 18:32:03 »

I wouldn't fly with Ryanair. Ever. Even if it meant escaping certain universal oblivion.

I cannot think of a single reason why anyone else should either.

They are the 18 year old sales representative of the aviation world that's just been given a brand new Cavalier Turbo... By that I mean that they buy brand new aircraft and replace them when they fail but barely check the tyres and oil in the meantime. Their flight deck attitude is, quite frankly, horrific.

By the way, did I mention not flying with them...
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Migv6

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Re: Lidl customer service
« Reply #20 on: 09 February 2018, 18:59:26 »

I think statutory rights in this country make the retailer responsible in the first instance, but many companies seem to make the warranty claim business as difficult as possible for the customer, presumably in the hope that they will just give up.

The Consumer Rights Act of 2015 has made the process much clearer with the retailers responsibility clarified.

It is a great improvement on the Sale Of Goods Act 1979 that I used to have to live with and enforce.

As for great customer service, the best retailers in our land are the ones who give great customer care, such as John Lewis, Marks & Spencer, Sainsbury's, Argos, etc, and they are the ones who will survive.  The ones who mis-lead and try and fob their customers off are the ones (I could name them, but for legal reasons I won't, and you know who they are as they frequently are in the auto game) who will eventually expire. ;)

Used to use John Lewis for this reason, but a couple of years ago, after purchasing a washing machine - which didn't turn up for 6 weeks ! we had the most appalling customer service I have ever experienced. Lie after lie after lie.  >:(
To their credit though, once we got to talk to a senior manager, he was shocked and appalled at his own staff and refunded 150 for our trouble.
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Lizzie Zoom

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Re: Lidl customer service
« Reply #21 on: 09 February 2018, 19:40:39 »

I think statutory rights in this country make the retailer responsible in the first instance, but many companies seem to make the warranty claim business as difficult as possible for the customer, presumably in the hope that they will just give up.

The Consumer Rights Act of 2015 has made the process much clearer with the retailers responsibility clarified.

It is a great improvement on the Sale Of Goods Act 1979 that I used to have to live with and enforce.

As for great customer service, the best retailers in our land are the ones who give great customer care, such as John Lewis, Marks & Spencer, Sainsbury's, Argos, etc, and they are the ones who will survive.  The ones who mis-lead and try and fob their customers off are the ones (I could name them, but for legal reasons I won't, and you know who they are as they frequently are in the auto game) who will eventually expire. ;)

Used to use John Lewis for this reason, but a couple of years ago, after purchasing a washing machine - which didn't turn up for 6 weeks ! we had the most appalling customer service I have ever experienced. Lie after lie after lie.  >:(
To their credit though, once we got to talk to a senior manager, he was shocked and appalled at his own staff and refunded 150 for our trouble.

That does not surprise me as they, the "partners", will do everything in their power to uphold their company's good name, which they have a vested interest in.

They once had to deliver a Parker Knoll dinning room table to us three times until we, and they, were totally satisfied it was without fault.  They even had a French polisher on hand with the third delivery in case any scratches were (again) evident. They are superb, and on a professional level I rate them as the best department store chain out there. :y :y

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mantaray

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Re: Lidl customer service
« Reply #22 on: 09 February 2018, 19:49:05 »

Can't agree more about Lidl. Never had any problems with their customer service. always been fast and polite at sorting any problems.
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Rods2

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Re: Lidl customer service
« Reply #23 on: 09 February 2018, 22:11:23 »

It is in the interests of the retailer to provide good customer service when all goods are on sale or return. :y :y :y The major multiples also include warranty performance terms in supply contracts as this also reflects on their reputation and customer satisfaction. :y :y :y

I find both Aldi and Lidl excellent and the incumbent big 6 supermarkets have still much to learn from both of them in terms of shopping experience. They also operate on much lower profit margins. The last time I looked at the Aldi UK annual accounts they made 2% profit compared to around 10% for the incumbents. Aldi will consider the UK one of their higher profit countries where in some markets they only make 0.5% overall profit.



Only a small percentage of a retailers stock is ever on Sale or Return.  It is mostly firm sale, but of course if goods are faulty then they can be returned for full credit.  Even then though there are variations of that with some agreements with manufacturers allowing an extra percentage discount to allow for any faulty goods received back from consumers.

Major retailers will also only deal with the most reputable of manufacturers or suppliers that are offering quality goods where the chances of high product failure are very small.  Of course even those manufacturers and suppliers can produce / handle faulty batches where failure rates are high, and then they will step in to assist the retailer, honouring their agreements with them, whilst protecting their good name, hence the product recall system. ;)

No retailer can survive on a 0.5% bottom line profit (I think that is what you are quoting Rod) without endangering their future existence.  However, what is happening is Aldi is "buying sales" whilst investing in store and CDC development.  That is a very expensive exercise and is using the profits of today to build their future, which has resulted in a 17% fall in profits in 2016.  In the meantime they are reducing their margins to the bone, and therefore must be controlling their costs to a level to match.  This is why Tesco and Sainsbury's have announced plans to greatly reduce their management and staff costs to help them fight Aldi, and Lidl, with lower prices.  That is the only way they can go.  But, the consumer should be aware of two major effects of this:
1.  Staff will be in fewer numbers and will not be able to give the level of service you currently enjoy
2.  Retail prices will eventually rise significantly once this retail price war is over as to stay in business the survivors MUST again return to acceptable levels for the shareholders and purely meet the costs that will be always there.

 ;)

I have extensively dealt with many UK multiples with a previous business and that was almost ALL on a sale or return basis. Now this might be sector based but was certainly not the impression the buyers gave. The multiples I've sold goods through were only minor ones that you probably never have heard of like Tesco, Sainsbury's, WH Smiths, Menzies, Curries and Dixons plus quite a few others. I have also dealt with many European multiples with the large ones were all on a sale or return basis. In the UK and Europe, prominent positioning, in-store advertising, window displays, special brochures like for Christmas all cost extra. Positioning was normally on a basis of additional discounts where all others you paid advertising fees. Retail discounts tend to be sector based depending upon the profit margins available after manufacturing costs. The US which I have also dealt with is completely different where you buy shelf space using what they call MDF's (market development funds) with pricing according to position with 'end caps' which have the highest sales costing the most. However, the retail margins are much lower where the MDF's basically cover the retailers running costs and the small margins are their profits. Credit terms in UK and Europe were normally on a minimum of at least net monthly but net two or three monthly were not unusual. In the US credit terms of up to 180 days or more are normal. Credit terms for toys in the US are on a net annual basis with settlement once a year in July! A good sector to avoid unless you have very deep pockets!

If you knew anything about European supermarkets you WOULD know net profits are all typically in the region of 0.5% to 2% (This is NOT gross profits where all business typically run in the 30-40% region or more, those that don't generally go bust pretty quickly). Yes, on these margins costs have to be very tightly controlled, hence the extensive use of sale and return, so they are not left holding loss making stock. These low margins have lead to a few retailers going bust, but massive consolidation has meant only a few very large continental supermarkets now exist with turnovers in the 60-100bn region. Aldi and Lidl were both around 70bn when I last checked a year or so a go. Many of the European retailers are privately family owed including Aldi and Lidl, so they have not got hungry public investors to keep happy at the 8-10% profit range of the 6 UK incumbents.
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Lizzie Zoom

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Re: Lidl customer service
« Reply #24 on: 10 February 2018, 11:52:46 »

It is in the interests of the retailer to provide good customer service when all goods are on sale or return. :y :y :y The major multiples also include warranty performance terms in supply contracts as this also reflects on their reputation and customer satisfaction. :y :y :y


I have extensively dealt with many UK multiples with a previous business and that was almost ALL on a sale or return basis. Now this might be sector based but was certainly not the impression the buyers gave. The multiples I've sold goods through were only minor ones that you probably never have heard of like Tesco, Sainsbury's, WH Smiths, Menzies, Curries and Dixons plus quite a few others.

If you knew anything about European supermarkets you WOULD know net profits are all typically in the region of 0.5% to 2% (This is NOT gross profits where all business typically run in the 30-40% region or more, those that don't generally go bust pretty quickly). Yes, on these margins costs have to be very tightly controlled, hence the extensive use of sale and return, so they are not left holding loss making stock. These low margins have lead to a few retailers going bust, but massive consolidation has meant only a few very large continental supermarkets now exist with turnovers in the 60-100bn region. Aldi and Lidl were both around 70bn when I last checked a year or so a go. Many of the European retailers are privately family owed including Aldi and Lidl, so they have not got hungry public investors to keep happy at the 8-10% profit range of the 6 UK incumbents.

So you are now a retailing expert Rod?  As somebody once said on here, you really do talk a load of crap at times!

I DO HAVE 40 years retail experience, 20 of those at senior business manager level.  I have had full P&L responsibility over a multi-million pound, 186 store retail business.  I can tell you that "Sale or Return" is on the minority of product ranges that UK manufacturers of the products we, and Tesco, Sainsbury, W.H.Smith, sell. (Yes I do know those retailers very well on a professional level, and I do not appreciate the snide remark!!).  I worked in liaison with our national Sales and Marketing Department, and knew the terms of our supplies, which were typical for our sector of the retail market that most of the names you kindly mention are in.  In fact as a general rule of thumb, any product with limited shelf life is on Firm Sale, although with us major retailers we could usually get assistance from the manufactures to clear any life expired product, or, most likely, any soon to be such affected lines.  I would love to know how you believe the likes of the supermarkets get "sale or return" on perishable foods!

In the news and magazine sector most stock is on sale or return, ande in fact it is those products that represented the highest level of gross profit generation.  But that is the nature of that part of the trade.  In terms of product placement we were paid tens of thousands of pounds of extra discount when promoting a manufacturers line, whilst also receiving regular sums for product placement on a regular basis.  This is the norm, as is the covering of the costs for all POS material.  Standard stuff.

It is also standard stuff for retailers to clear slow moving product, usually be seeking help from the manufacturer, but the manufacturer will not be interested in taking the goods back.

In regards to profit margins, do you really thing I believed 0.5% profit referred to gross margins? I would refer you to my former post covering the aspect of margins and what effect it all has on the retailer and the consumer.  For your info Aldi have recorded three successive years of declining profits to December 2016, with in 2016 profits falling 17%, albeit on sales growth of 13.5%.  Regardless of what you think Rod, and even allowing for the large investment being made by that company in stores and CDC's, no company can survive long term on such low profit margins, with as I calculate, just 0.24% bottom line margin.  Retail is ALL about making profit!

Now Rod, go back to what you are good at, Political assessment and summary! ;)
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ronnyd

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Re: Lidl customer service
« Reply #25 on: 10 February 2018, 13:28:11 »

If you have trouble reading that Rods you can borrow my glasses. ;D
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terbert

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Re: Lidl customer service
« Reply #26 on: 10 February 2018, 16:24:29 »

If you have trouble reading that Rods you can borrow my glasses. ;D

I apologize in advance, no disrespect to anyone involved.....
but this reply really did make me laugh. Not expected after I had waded through the previous posts !!! ;D ;D ;D
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TheBoy

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Re: Lidl customer service
« Reply #27 on: 10 February 2018, 18:57:50 »

MFI
Which is a shame, as now the only option for "go out, buy it, and bring it home in the boot" flatpack type stuff are the god awful Ikea. A far inferior product, and even worse customer service.  But they do do awfully nice meatballs, and cheap hotdogs...   ...and it pisses the staff off when I nip through the shortcuts in the store to get to my hotdogs, rather than follow their silly arrows ;D
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Olympia5776

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Re: Lidl customer service
« Reply #28 on: 10 February 2018, 19:05:33 »

Somebody needs to read the guidance request at the top of the home page...
This has all the hallmarks of (another ) departure  ;D
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Bigron

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Re: Lidl customer service
« Reply #29 on: 10 February 2018, 19:06:38 »

Having never been to IKEA (am I lucky?), I don't understand this "you can't go where you want to" thing; do the staff frogmarch you around to where they want you to go?
Also, I hear of people saying they spend ages in the store, far longer than they want to - do they hold you prisoner?  :o

Ron.
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