Omega Owners Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

News:

Welcome to OOF

Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Change Rear Wheel Bearing  (Read 3150 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Jan Suhr

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Nyköping, Sweden
  • Posts: 154
    • 2001 Omega Caravan 3.2 V6
    • View Profile
Change Rear Wheel Bearing
« on: 25 May 2015, 17:54:17 »

A while ago I started to hear a bad noise from the rear, it sounded from the right side and increased with speed. When turning right the sound was gone, typical of a wheel bearing that need replacement.

I looked for some info on the net and found a German Omega site that described it with images from a GM service manual, that manual is available on this link:
 
In the GM workshop manual they refer to a special tool set that is designed for this work, this tool might be available at a GM shop but the price is probably very high.

I bought a bearing puller tool designed for front wheel drive cars and it can be used on an Omega rear wheel bearing except for pushing in the wheel hub that required a special solution.


OK Let's start with the fun part  :D


First you have to remove the caliper and disc to reach the axle hub, there are a guide how this is done here: http://www.omegaowners.com/forum/index.php?topic=90580.0

When all that is done and the caliper is out of the way it's time to dismount the driveshaft from the hub.

You will need something that hold the axle still and prevent rotation when you loose the driveshaft bolts and also later when the hub nut is removed. I just took a piece of scrap iron I had laying around and drilled a 13mm hole and grinded away a bit so it would fit.


Then the driveshaft can be loosened and removed, you have to rotate the axle and remount the rotation stop bar a few times to get all six bolts.





The hub axle is secured with a nut that has a lock ring, this lock ring is easy to remove. You just pry it away with a screwdriver.


Now it is time for the part that needs some real muscle and strong tools, the hub nut is torqued to 300Nm so you need a long leverage bar to get it moving. Your car has to be high up on the jackstands for the leverage bar to have some room to move. I had a 1,5 meter pipe that I lengthened my long draw bar with and even with that long it needed a strong pull to start to move. For me it just started to move before I ran out of room. But the rest of it could be loosened with my long ratchet wrench.

With the bearing puller kit they have included some bolts that you can use to pull out the hub. They just use the wheel nut threads and eventually reach the brake shield. You should probably put something under the bolts to protect the shield, I didn't and I got some dents in it that I don't think will have any impact.

Turn those three bolts evenly and you'll see that the hub start to come out.
Here is a view from the rear on the progress.


When pulling out the hub the outer bearing ring got stuck on the axle and pulled the bearing apart, this is how it looked when it was out. I have started to remove the outer lock ring on the picture.


Now it is time to start pulling out the bearing, here is how the tool look when applied.




The it just time to start turning on that wrench, on the backside my wrench could rest against the trailing arm. It was not any resistance here just a lot of turning.

And here you have the empty hole:


I did some cleaning up with an emery paper and before putting in the new bearing I sprayed the hole with some 5-56.

To press in the new bearing is more or less the same procedure as removing it.


And here is is in place with the new lock ring.


Now it is time to figure out how to get the hub in place, I had given this some thought the days before I started this job and figured I could have some scrap iron on each side and then use long threaded rods to pull it together. I also needed some thing the get the rear iron bar moved to the center of the car to get around the trailing arm. I cut out a flat iron and drilled it to fit the driveshaft coupler on the hub and bolt it to that. I got a couple of M10x1,25mm 80mm long bolts.


And here is my home made bearing press:




I was a lot of turning the wrench to get the axle in to the bearing, an occasional whack with a sledgehammer when it was nearly in the all way helped some. My arms got tired. It was a lot of stress on this, the angle bar was slightly bent but the axle slided in nicely.

End of part 1
« Last Edit: 12 September 2015, 22:24:10 by Jimbob »
Logged
Jan Suhr
Stockholm, Sweden
www.protouring.se

Jan Suhr

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Nyköping, Sweden
  • Posts: 154
    • 2001 Omega Caravan 3.2 V6
    • View Profile
Re: Change Rear Wheel Bearing
« Reply #1 on: 25 May 2015, 17:58:02 »

Part 2 continue

The last part I could pull in with the hub nut on the back side. When it is in to the hilt the nut is solid.


You now have to attach the rotation blocker again and tighten the hub nut with all the force you can apply. I hanged in the wrench until it didn't move.

Lastly you have to apply the new lock ring, it is slightly larger than the hole it sits in and I used the 32mm socket and gave it a whack with a hammer, I had a short pipe to the socket. After the use of the hammer the lock ring sits in the hole and it just need a smal nudge to creep in to the gaps in the coupler.




After that it's just a matter of bolting everything up in the reverse order. The bolts for the driveshaft should only be torqued to 50Nm so take it easy on them if you don't have a torque wrench.


Good luck with your job here, it take a couple of hours. Now my car runs nice and quiet again.

Jan
« Last Edit: 12 September 2015, 22:24:42 by Jimbob »
Logged
Jan Suhr
Stockholm, Sweden
www.protouring.se
Pages: [1]   Go Up
 

Page created in 0.087 seconds with 17 queries.