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Chat Area => General Car Chat => Topic started by: Nick W on 10 September 2016, 19:42:03

Title: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 10 September 2016, 19:42:03
For the first time in ages, I've managed to get up and do something every day this week. Hopefully it will be good practice for when I get around to finding some full time employment.


Monday, I made these:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/f77wz67gzd143g8/JackAdapters.jpg?dl=1)


They're adapters for jacking the tail of a small aircraft, and apparently they're normally a lot more expensive than the £25 I charged ???


Tuesday I collected a friend's Grand Vitara, fitted new shocks and wipers and put it in for an MOT.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 10 September 2016, 19:56:11
Wednesday's job was to make this look better:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/mthlhoteu805hlh/TiredMGFSteeringWheel.jpg?dl=1)


That's off an MGF, and the 'aluminium' trim had worn through. Think Irmscher wheels for an Omega.


A couple of minutes with some scotchbrite had it ready to mask:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/8flof70l1h9pum6/ScotchbritedMGFSteeringWheel.jpg?dl=1)


Then I designed and fabricated a high-tech Custom Clamping Fixture**:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/nxexnytj5306mi5/MGFSteeringWheelCustomClampingFixture.jpg?dl=1)


Yes, I know I'm not very good at masking!


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/b5hxagg95u7e8b1/MGFSteeringWheelBasecoat%20-%20Copy.jpg?dl=1)


A couple of coats of Z147 Star Silver, and some 2-pack clear:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/5dqtayiveiuz7kh/CompletedMGFSteeringWheel%20-%20Copy.jpg?dl=1)


It wouldn't match a piece of trim that it touches, but it is bloody close! Plus, it's going to be much more hard wearing. And I already had the paint. One of those it ought to work jobs.


** The CCF only looks like a scrap bit of 2x2 softwood, with a 14mm hole drilled through and then cut in half to clamp a 15mm rod in my bike workstand.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 10 September 2016, 20:02:06
Thursday's job was to find out why the resin adjusters in Andrews headlamps weren't working.


So, I stuck them in the oven, and replaced the adjusters with some scrounged aluminium ones which we know work.


The resin ones showed a couple of problems:


The inserted pin and ball can be pushed out if you wind the adjuster too far; and it's easy to strip the tapped thread. So, if you use these, you need to ensure that they are set close to where they need to be before you reassemble the lamp. When you adjust the beam setting on the car be gentle. Then they are likely to be a decent solution to knackered adjusters.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 10 September 2016, 20:08:51
Friday, I assembled two sets of these:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/69n762u8rdz4yyo/FrontStrutParts%20-%20Copy.jpg?dl=1)


Like this:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/5tse25bci35y4tn/TheRealUseForCordlessImpacts.jpg?dl=1)


(which is the real use of cordless impacts for DIY use)


into these:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/ndtb6m3qcud0vb6/FrontStrutAssembled%20-%20Copy.jpg?dl=1)


And to complete the prep for a front suspension rebuild, this morning I fitted a set of polybushes


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/905n3qw1m1s50lb/PolyWishboneBushes.jpg?dl=1)




One tip from this which saves needing extra hands for assembly:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/3xasotjk8wgkfxl/SupergluetheIsolatorInPlace.jpg?dl=1)


a couple of spots of superglue to hold the rubber isolater in place!

Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: amba on 10 September 2016, 20:12:49
Headlight beams now fully corrected ,Nick and for the first time in ages headlights both light the road in front of car,not the trees on the n/side and just about the front of the bumper on the o/side.
Top job and thanks
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 10 September 2016, 20:16:38
Remember the jacking adapters?


Turns out they work so well(compared to the stack of washers and pins that were being used), that they want some more pads for the actual jacks. Which I will cut from the bar at the front:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/ibwsw65cw46rbvu/JackPads%20-%20Copy.jpg?dl=1)


Note the use of engineering grade duct-tape to create a precision fit on the part on the left!


This will be a job for Monday, as I'm ringing twice tomorrow with a visit to the Kent Classic Car Show at Aylesford in between. The plan is to have some beers and a curry if we get the quarter peal of Steadman triples in the afternoon. Or if we don't ;D


I plan on charging £30 each for these bits, which will provide some negotiating room if necessary.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Weds on 10 September 2016, 20:24:39


This will be a job for Monday, as I'm ringing twice tomorrow with a visit to the Kent Classic Car Show at Aylesford in between. The plan is to have some beers and a curry if we get the quarter peal of Steadman triples in the afternoon. Or if we don't ;D



I'll be at Aylesford with my Porsche 928, stop and say hello if you see me...
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: YZ250 on 10 September 2016, 20:53:33
You seem a handy guy on the machines Nick.  :y Are you toolmaker trained or self taught, not particularly relevant but just curious.  :)
Very handy to have the gear to be able to knock stuff up, it's what I miss most about not being on the machines any more.  :y
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 10 September 2016, 20:53:59


This will be a job for Monday, as I'm ringing twice tomorrow with a visit to the Kent Classic Car Show at Aylesford in between. The plan is to have some beers and a curry if we get the quarter peal of Steadman triples in the afternoon. Or if we don't ;D



I'll be at Aylesford with my Porsche 928, stop and say hello if you see me...


Deal :y
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 10 September 2016, 21:10:18
You seem a handy guy on the machines Nick.  :y Are you toolmaker trained or self taught, not particularly relevant but just curious.  :)
Very handy to have the gear to be able to knock stuff up, it's what I miss most about not being on the machines any more.  :y


Self taught - I bought and learnt how to use a small lathe because I was fed up with pestering mates for odd jobs. I wish I'd done it while my grandad was alive, as he was a professional machinist. The first thing I made were a custom pair of axle to leaf spring locating pegs: £400 for a £1 part if they had been available ::) Then a small mill for similar reasons. TIG welder, and other stuff, you know how it goes.


Able to knock stuff up is the perfect phrase. I'll happily do mechanical jobs, metalwork, bodywork, simple trimming(I must get my aunt to show me how to use my industrial sewing machine ;D ) because they're all building on basic skills that I started learning as a kid. Unless it's woodwork, where looks like it was nailed together by a pissed amputee but probably won't fall apart is more accurate. I draw the line at electronics and programming: they just give me a headache!
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: YZ250 on 10 September 2016, 22:00:03
You seem a handy guy on the machines Nick.  :y Are you toolmaker trained or self taught, not particularly relevant but just curious.  :)
Very handy to have the gear to be able to knock stuff up, it's what I miss most about not being on the machines any more.  :y


Self taught - I bought and learnt how to use a small lathe because I was fed up with pestering mates for odd jobs. I wish I'd done it while my grandad was alive, as he was a professional machinist. The first thing I made were a custom pair of axle to leaf spring locating pegs: £400 for a £1 part if they had been available ::) Then a small mill for similar reasons. TIG welder, and other stuff, you know how it goes.


Able to knock stuff up is the perfect phrase. I'll happily do mechanical jobs, metalwork, bodywork, simple trimming(I must get my aunt to show me how to use my industrial sewing machine ;D ) because they're all building on basic skills that I started learning as a kid. Unless it's woodwork, where looks like it was nailed together by a pissed amputee but probably won't fall apart is more accurate. I draw the line at electronics and programming: they just give me a headache!

Nice one.  :y  You can never have too much equipment, it enables you to make a specialist tool from scratch as you know.  :y  I was lucky that the amount of hub pullers, slide hammers, bearing tools and many other creations that I made were all courtesy of the MOD.  ;)  :)

I was also lucky that I had an apprentice master who was interested in cars. He used to create cars that shouldn't have been, like a MK11 Cortina with Jag engine and running gear,  Land Rovers with Jap engines etc. This was late seventies/early eighties and he was a damn good engineer. He would roll his own arches, weld bits in to make bits fit etc. I learned a lot from him and when he saw me pondering over a car problem he would say "get on with it, it's only a load of metal bits held together with a load of bolts".  ;D  If only life was that simple.  ::)

Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Mr Gav on 10 September 2016, 23:22:18
You seem a handy guy on the machines Nick.  :y Are you toolmaker trained or self taught, not particularly relevant but just curious.  :)
Very handy to have the gear to be able to knock stuff up, it's what I miss most about not being on the machines any more.  :y


Self taught - I bought and learnt how to use a small lathe because I was fed up with pestering mates for odd jobs. I wish I'd done it while my grandad was alive, as he was a professional machinist. The first thing I made were a custom pair of axle to leaf spring locating pegs: £400 for a £1 part if they had been available ::) Then a small mill for similar reasons. TIG welder, and other stuff, you know how it goes.


Able to knock stuff up is the perfect phrase. I'll happily do mechanical jobs, metalwork, bodywork, simple trimming(I must get my aunt to show me how to use my industrial sewing machine ;D ) because they're all building on basic skills that I started learning as a kid. Unless it's woodwork, where looks like it was nailed together by a pissed amputee but probably won't fall apart is more accurate. I draw the line at electronics and programming: they just give me a headache!

Hats off to you Nick, I totally admire people that are self taught and are very good at what they do. Proper garden shed engineering in the true British way  ;D

BTW....hope you charged a small fortune for using the ultra rare Z147 paint  ;D
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Kevin Wood on 11 September 2016, 10:14:39
For the first time in ages, I've managed to get up and do something every day this week. Hopefully it will be good practice for when I get around to finding some full time employment.


Monday, I made these:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/f77wz67gzd143g8/JackAdapters.jpg?dl=1)


They're adapters for jacking the tail of a small aircraft, and apparently they're normally a lot more expensive than the £25 I charged ???

You could always add a couple of zeros to the price and sell them to audiophiles for supporting their equipment. Might need to make up some bull5h1t science for the advert, but... :y
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 16 October 2016, 19:32:40
We've got to remove a propeller for servicing.


Which lead to being asked to make one of these:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/bl56nzp3xjtfzhv/HarvardPropWrench.jpg?dl=1)


"but with a smaller hex"


So I had a dig about in my stock, and produced this lot:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/p8mdnlsdx017syr/PropWrenchParts.jpg?dl=1)


Left to right: mandrel for the 47.5mm AF Hex, Hex machined from 15mm plate and some 2" tube


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/rjp2wcemah1e7ku/MachiningHex.jpg?dl=1)


That's machining the hex using the mandrel held in an ER32 collet block


And then some welding:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/3pywashy5mstdeu/StimsonPropWrench.jpg?dl=1)


I'll find out if it works tomorrow.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: STEMO on 16 October 2016, 20:25:32
Locking at that piece of work and guessing how it's going to be used, I think your weld may get stress tested.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 16 October 2016, 20:32:54
We're going to use the same 2 1/2 foot length of bar supplied with the first tool(that is also welded together). It's been used several times and is still straight, so I'm confident hopeful  ;D


Besides, making the tool from a single piece of 60mm bar is not a job for me!
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: STEMO on 16 October 2016, 20:38:37
I'm sure it will be fine Nick, and, if it's not, then you will think of something else.
If something were made from a solid bar, then surely it would just comprise of a 12" long hex with a hole in it? Get cracking.  ;D
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: TheBoy on 17 October 2016, 09:50:59
Get cracking.
Is that the noise a weld makes as it fails ;D


(Not that I think it will, as a good weld should be virtually as strong as solid metal, and I know Nick W has done a fair bit of welding :y)
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 17 October 2016, 11:05:56
The prop was much tighter than it should have been, and needed a 16stone weight hanging off a 5foot long bar and a lump hammer to undo it. I did have to weld a strap across the open end of the tube.

The tool doesn't look quite such an engineered piece now!
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: STEMO on 17 October 2016, 14:00:37
The prop was much tighter than it should have been, and needed a 16stone weight hanging off a 5foot long bar and a lump hammer to undo it. I did have to weld a strap across the open end of the tube.

The tool doesn't look quite such an engineered piece now!
Come on, you know you wanna show us...please  ;D
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 19 November 2016, 21:08:46
Haven't done much lately, just a few bushes, and converted a normal nut to a castle nut.


But this week I was handed a partially disassembled voltmeter, with a cracked glass. Can you do something with that? she said.


So after grumbling about how the clamping ring was badly bent, I used the body of the gauge to draw a circle on a scrap of perspex, and gnawed it off with a hacksaw. Some careful belt sanding brought it close to size, and then draw-filed it to a nice where's my little tappy hammer fit into the body.


At this point it became clear that the rubber sealing ring on the front had a bit missing. Although my O-ring set had one the right diameter it was much too thick. So we had a scratch around in the stores, and found one much too big, but half the the thickness, all in a nice paper envelope with an official AN part number on it. I cut the necessary amount out of it, and superglued it together to make a much smaller ring.


It only took another 20minutes  to straighten the clamping ring and fit all the new pieces together like this:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/qi3i8wu1w8cufv4/Voltmeter%5B1%5D.jpg?dl=1)


There's just enough clearance for the needle to move!
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: aaronjb on 20 November 2016, 11:24:41
a nice where's my little tappy hammer fit

Also called "a machinists fit", I think. Very satisfying when you get it right! (less so if you overcook it a bit and then ruin the new bit trying to dig it back out when it's half way home. Not that I've ever had to do that to anything, you understand..)
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 20 November 2016, 12:44:47
a nice where's my little tappy hammer fit

Also called "a machinists fit", I think. Very satisfying when you get it right! (less so if you overcook it a bit and then ruin the new bit trying to dig it back out when it's half way home. Not that I've ever had to do that to anything, you understand..)

I think you're right, but it's less descriptive if you haven't heard the term before.

My usual problem with this sort of thing is having to make another because the last tiny bit of fettling was too much, and the part is now too small. Fortunately, I don't work with expensive materials ;D
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 29 January 2017, 20:04:16
Continuing on from the What did you do to your car today thread, here is my plan for rebuilding the diff/rear subframe mounts. I could fabri-cobble a one-off 'jig' out of scrap MDF in minutes, which would solve the single broken mount I have.



What I intend to build is a bolt together metal jig like this:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/nh8qaaobvexlrtm/Differential%20Mount%20Mould%20Jig.jpg?dl=1)


that will clamp both metal parts of the failed mount in the correct orientation, and then fill where the rubber used to be with castable polyurethane(the red area, although I shall use black as I'm not 18):


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/ga6bjwesqmt0ut5/Differential%20Mount%20Mould%20Jig%20Urethane.png?dl=1)


Copious use of silicone release spray should make the repaired mounts 'easily' removable ;D
Some further thought suggests building it on a bigger plate, replacing the angle upright with a thicker piece and doubling the clamps. This will enable me to bolt a pair of diff mounts back to back, and repair both with one mix of urethane. That ought to make THIS  (http://www.ebay.de/itm/Neuer-Omega-B-Dampfungsblock-Hinterachse-rear-subframe-mount-GM-90447197-new/172405878264) sort of thing a lot more affordable!


What do you all think?
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: amba on 29 January 2017, 20:09:36
You clever old sod ;)
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Doctor Gollum on 29 January 2017, 20:15:05
I used cardboard, grease proof paper and wax...

Reckon that should do it :D
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Tick Tock on 29 January 2017, 20:16:30
Liking this so far.  :y :y

In years to come when Omegas are down to double figures out there on the road, this is one aspect that could make the difference between a 'saver' or a 'scrapper'. I noticed mine were looking a bit rough around the edges, and careful use of a sharp blade makes them look more tidy, but was of concern for the future.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 29 January 2017, 23:56:13
Liking this so far.  :y :y

In years to come when Omegas are down to double figures out there on the road, this is one aspect that could make the difference between a 'saver' or a 'scrapper'. I noticed mine were looking a bit rough around the edges, and careful use of a sharp blade makes them look more tidy, but was of concern for the future.


Mine both looked OK, until I undid the bolts and the metal outer fell of the O/S mount.


I've ordered the urethane, and if it isn't raining when I get in tomorrow will remove the better mount for a measure-up
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Lazydocker on 31 January 2017, 10:23:45
I'm interested in a set of diff mounts once you have the jig made :y

(Or you could lend me the jig and I'll pour my own)  ::) :D
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 31 January 2017, 14:59:00
Once I had the knackered mount off the car I did some redesigning to simplify the jig, and made this out of finest ScrapbiniumTm:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/rff4oxrhh30m83r/DiffBushJig%5B1%5D.jpg?dl=1)


That's an old Sunbeam gearbox cover, a chunk of 20mm ally plate and a couple of spigots to locate the inner parts of the bushes. It all bolts together to make removing the repaired bushes a bit easier - polyurethane will stick pretty much anything to anything, so I intend to grease every surface I don't want to bond together.


This will enable me to do a pair of bushes at a time, and will be durable enough for lots of use.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Doctor Gollum on 31 January 2017, 15:00:17
Afternoon well spent :y
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 31 January 2017, 15:36:47
And here's the knackered mount cleaned up and clamped ready for the materials to arrive:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/pm3tfan7pkwb5w9/DiffBushClamped%5B1%5D.jpg?dl=1)
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: annihilator on 31 January 2017, 18:32:45
some guy in germany is doing a similar thing
http://www.ebay.pl/itm/Neuer-Omega-B-Dampfungsblock-Hinterachse-rear-subframe-mount-GM-90447197-new-/172405878264?hash=item282430edf8:g:URwAAOSwENxXm4W1 (http://www.ebay.pl/itm/Neuer-Omega-B-Dampfungsblock-Hinterachse-rear-subframe-mount-GM-90447197-new-/172405878264?hash=item282430edf8:g:URwAAOSwENxXm4W1)
John.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 31 January 2017, 19:07:48
some guy in germany is doing a similar thing
http://www.ebay.pl/itm/Neuer-Omega-B-Dampfungsblock-Hinterachse-rear-subframe-mount-GM-90447197-new-/172405878264?hash=item282430edf8:g:URwAAOSwENxXm4W1 (http://www.ebay.pl/itm/Neuer-Omega-B-Dampfungsblock-Hinterachse-rear-subframe-mount-GM-90447197-new-/172405878264?hash=item282430edf8:g:URwAAOSwENxXm4W1)
John.


Yep, posted that link in an earlier post. But, it's a minimum of 180Euros plus the waiting time and a core charge of another 40Euros. I have about 3 hours in this so far and one of those is removing the mount and cleaning the rubber off it, plus about £15 for the polyurethane. I could have made a one-use jig in 5 minutes from some ply and a handful of screws, but this one will be reusable(I've had a couple of nibbles already) and be easier to remove the repaired mount - I hope! It's about the size of 2 CDs, so I might even post it to people who have the same problem, I haven't decided which yet.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: annihilator on 31 January 2017, 19:19:52
apologies,missed the earlier link.I'm sure quite a few of us would put orders in for them if you have the time.
John. :y
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Doctor Gollum on 31 January 2017, 19:44:17
I would sell refurbished rather than lend the tooling out. I appreciate that this might be a slightly misanthropic approach, but you don't need to sell them at silly prices.

Equally you could try different compounds for varying rigidity to suit individual tastes... this bepoke approach could be priced accordingly  ;)

By using mould release on the components you could sell the inserts, negating the need for exchanging old parts... simply send the core off for the end user to fit. :y
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 31 January 2017, 19:52:53
I would sell refurbished rather than lend the tooling out. I appreciate that this might be a slightly misanthropic approach, but you don't need to sell them at silly prices.

Equally you could try different compounds for varying rigidity to suit individual tastes... this bepoke approach could be priced accordingly  ;)

By using mould release on the components you could sell the inserts, negating the need for exchanging old parts... simply send the core off for the end user to fit. :y


In order:
complete parts is probably the way I'd go. We have a similar idea for refurbishing MGF displacers on an exchange basis.


Too much buggering about. You get what you get.


Looking at the shape of the central mounting block, I don't think it will extract and then fit easily. And I would much rather both parts were bonded together like the originals; the whole mount would need to be wider to stop it pulling apart.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Doctor Gollum on 31 January 2017, 20:03:40
1. Concept is sound.

2. Fair dos, just a thought, although possibly 15 years too late...

3. You're setting the the centre in three planes... even underload it won't budge. Centre piece bolts to the subframe, and the carrier holds it tight to the chassis. The only variable is how clean the purchaser can get the metal work in order that they fit the moulding perfectly otherwise you get play, and play means catastrophic wear...

Thinking it through, you're right ;) although the concept is sound, there are simply too many variables :-\
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 02 February 2017, 18:10:06
The polyurethane arrived today.


So when I got in from work, I applied lots of vaseline to the jig and parts of the mount I don't want bonded together, mixed about 150g of material, and poured it in.


It's now curing in front of the fire:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/w7oemk656x3as8k/DiffMountCuring%5B1%5D.jpg?dl=1)


It's a small thing, but I should have ordered some black pigment, which would make the finished part look a bit better.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Doctor Gollum on 02 February 2017, 19:07:55
That looks allwight ;)

Sorry, couldn't help myself :-[
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: biggriffin on 02 February 2017, 20:29:42
https://www.elichem.co.uk/p-4-anti-roll-bar-repair-resin.aspx
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: X30XE on 02 February 2017, 21:51:11
The polyurethane arrived today.


So when I got in from work, I applied lots of vaseline to the jig and parts of the mount I don't want bonded together, mixed about 150g of material, and poured it in.


It's now curing in front of the fire:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/w7oemk656x3as8k/DiffMountCuring%5B1%5D.jpg?dl=1)


It's a small thing, but I should have ordered some black pigment, which would make the finished part look a bit better.

doood sweet m8. how many horsepowers will it add in white??   :)
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: ronnyd on 02 February 2017, 22:37:56
Are you infringing any patent rights or anything. ???
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Doctor Gollum on 02 February 2017, 22:42:05
Are you infringing any patent rights or anything. ???
Nope, because nobody else makes them new and these are simply refurbishment of the original component ;)

As opposed to a blatant copy trying to be passed off as a genuine article...
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 03 February 2017, 00:36:44
Are you infringing any patent rights or anything. ???




How? I've taken a oppsed part that I already own, and repaired it using common materials and decades old techniques. If they were still​ available, I would have just bought one.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Doctor Gollum on 03 February 2017, 06:15:42
No different to refurbishing wishbones ;)
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: biggriffin on 03 February 2017, 19:53:40
Are you infringing any patent rights or anything. ???

really. :o
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 03 February 2017, 20:29:42
I removed all the bolts, and the part came off the jig easily:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/1s2b039qhucqkp0/DiffMountCompleted%5B1%5D.jpg?dl=1)


I don't need to be quite so generous with the release agent, as the surface finish isn't brilliant. That won't affect how well it works, but it's no more effort to make a better looking part. The metal outer could do with a coat of paint, although it isn't going to get one.


I'll fit it tomorrow, along with the front springs which should restore the car's ride and ground clearance.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: biggriffin on 04 February 2017, 08:57:58
I do hope nick, that when you test these non gm parts you are  fully aware of the risks you are taking for the membership, please ensure you wear the correct safety equipment, and then we shall need a full non-senseical report in gobbledygook. ;D
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 04 February 2017, 09:11:04
I could start a new organisation with one rule; just do the job in the way that is most efficient to you.


I would call it Pragmatists Club, but shortening it to PC might lead to some confusion ;D
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: TheBoy on 04 February 2017, 09:31:07
That's looking good Nick W.  Will be interested what they are like on the car :y
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 04 February 2017, 09:49:26
That's looking good Nick W.  Will be interested what they are like on the car :y


Dirtier ;D


It's just a prototype repair caused  by the unavailability of new replacements, and the high cost of tired secondhand parts. Using secondhand rubber mounts smacks of desperation to me. The lack of voids in a stable material suggest it ought to be durable which is my main requirement. You've probably noticed I've only done one, as that's all I need so far.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 04 February 2017, 17:21:38
I do hope nick, that when you test these non gm parts you are  fully aware of the risks you are taking for the membership, please ensure you wear the correct safety equipment, and then we shall need a full non-senseical report in gobbledygook. ;D


Trev, it is a gm part - Good Make :y


Needing a slight tweak to make the second bolt fit, it's on the car.


Here's the full report: it works.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: biggriffin on 04 February 2017, 18:29:10
I do hope nick, that when you test these non gm parts you are  fully aware of the risks you are taking for the membership, please ensure you wear the correct safety equipment, and then we shall need a full non-senseical report in gobbledygook. ;D


Trev, it is a gm part - Good Make :y


Needing a slight tweak to make the second bolt fit, it's on the car.


Here's the full report: it works.
 

 8)  ;)
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: STEMO on 04 February 2017, 18:34:06
I do hope nick, that when you test these non gm parts you are  fully aware of the risks you are taking for the membership, please ensure you wear the correct safety equipment, and then we shall need a full non-senseical report in gobbledygook. ;D


Trev, it is a gm part - Good Make :y


Needing a slight tweak to make the second bolt fit, it's on the car.


Here's the full report: it works.
Oh no, no, no. You can't say that until you've stress tested it. Drop it off at Jamie's tomorrow for a QC test.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 04 February 2017, 18:50:44
If I was worried about stress testing it, I've a mate who is far harder on mechanical stuff than anyone on this forum. ;D


Considering how much better the back of the car is now, I'm wondering how long the mount was broken.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Doctor Gollum on 04 February 2017, 19:08:27
Or how long the other side lasts... but at least you can now fix that the same day :y
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 19 February 2017, 23:50:41
This weekend's job was supposed to be modifying the first MGF hydragas displacer so that we can refill them with nitrogen.
I had all the parts; a displacer, some metal bodied high pressure schrader valves, and some bosses tapped 1/8BSP(actually pneumatic fittings). The plan was to turn the fittings to a convenient size, drill a corresponding hole in the top of the displacer and TIG the two together. But some cretin ordered brass instead of steel fittings, so that plan is postponed.


That meant I couldn't put off fitting the milling spindle to the lathe any longer:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/ydxqd9zy88kmz4b/VerticalSlideFitted%5B1%5D.jpg?dl=1)
That's the vertical slide for my original mini-lathe with some extra tapped holes, all on a scratch built mount.


Add an ER11 spindle motor(£80 off Ebay, including the mount, power supply and set of collets)


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/g88ypi58c1sf8bz/MillingMotor2%5B1%5D.jpg?dl=1)


and


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/ir5vq2ytvewybuj/MillingMotor%5B1%5D.jpg?dl=1)




Now I can drill cross holes, mill keyways, slots, hexheads etc and drill PCDs without having to transfer the part to the mill.


Like this quick and dirty testpiece, indexing the chuck jaws by eye:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/z6ksj42ihw7ijzw/MakingTestPiece%5B1%5D.jpg?dl=1)


Next job is a stepper-motor headstock dividing attachment, then I can start making the wheels for a simple clock
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: henryd on 20 February 2017, 10:51:09
Very impressive Nick :y
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 26 February 2017, 19:14:07
This little hole is an MOT failure:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/9loxju8394oeso3/LittleHole%5B1%5D.jpg?dl=1)


So I cut it out and had a poke about behind it:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/o3njh3624uryz2s/CrustyMess%5B1%5D.jpg?dl=1)


Leading to this:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/75qs9i6ugm4apdl/CutOut%5B1%5D.jpg?dl=1)


A load of cutting and welding later:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/2e9r4wpneh1t9r5/MostlyRepaired%5B1%5D.jpg?dl=1)


meant I could finally do the 10minute job I started with >:(


None of this is helped by having to remove the seat cushion, various trim pieces, wiring, sound deadening and seam sealer so that they don't get cut through/set alight. There's also a crusty hole in the sill just in front of the jacking point, but that's not visible with the sill cover in place. So I'll get a new sill(both, probably) and replace them in the summer when I'm not working to a deadline.

At least changing the headlamp washer pump was a two minute job :y Looking back, I don't think they've ever worked in the six years I've owned the car.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: X30XE on 26 February 2017, 19:49:12
Yeah... see the thing is... I've never learnt to weld so... I'm gonna have to adopt you.. DAD... and you're gonna have to help me fix this...

 :)

(http://i605.photobucket.com/albums/tt133/011011011/20170226_132609_zpstywhdutn.jpg)
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 02 April 2017, 18:56:23
This week's jobs:


MGF wheel bearing:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/9hsseyzv0aa4vjm/MGFwheelBearing%5B1%5D.jpg?dl=1)


That was the easy bit; it took 8 tons of pressure to push the hub out :o


And I made this blanking plug for the auxiliary fuel tank hose on a Yak18, as we can't buy them:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/61xqxxa26r3smsr/FueltankHoseBlank%5B1%5D.jpg?dl=1)
It's M24x1.5, cut on a piece of 1" hex bar. That's the first thread I've done just by the numbers, without being able to try the mating part, hopefully it will work
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Lizzie Zoom on 02 April 2017, 20:15:38
That looks very impressive :y

In my time I have done some die and tapping but nothing on that scale!

I remember it being very satisfying. 8)
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 02 April 2017, 20:52:48
M24x1.5 dies start at about £60, and would need a big die holder and a lot of effort to turn it.
That was single point threaded in the lathe.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Lizzie Zoom on 02 April 2017, 20:57:26
M24x1.5 dies start at about £60, and would need a big die holder and a lot of effort to turn it.
That was single point threaded in the lathe.

I rather suspected a lathe would be involved. If I had the space I would love one of them :D ;)
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Kevin Wood on 02 April 2017, 21:25:58
And I made this blanking plug for the auxiliary fuel tank hose on a Yak18, as we can't buy them:

 :-* :-* :-* :y
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 16 April 2017, 21:29:50
I got home earlier than I expected to from the quarter peal, and decided that I've put this job off for long enough:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/6xs19woad4avkyl/DisplacerBoss%5B1%5D.jpg?dl=1)


that's a high pressure schraeder valve and threaded boss to weld onto an MGF suspension displacer like this:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/lyrun7n20lwij4a/repairedDisplacer%5B1%5D.jpg?dl=1)


the next step is to recharge it with 25bar of nitrogen, do the same to the other 3, and fit them to the car. Which should make the thing handle and ride properly again.


And I made a new pin to repair the shears that you can see in the last picture. Apparently they're still new, as she's only had them twenty years ::)
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Lincs Robert on 16 April 2017, 21:42:19
What's a quarter peal in your world?  8)

In mine we did 2 today. Are we in the same world? I suspect so.

How many have you done? I've done 426 .......
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 16 April 2017, 21:45:05
The last two were Grandsire Caters.


I've done about twenty since I started ringing again 18months ago.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Lincs Robert on 16 April 2017, 22:02:35
The last two were Grandsire Caters.


I've done about twenty since I started ringing again 18months ago.

Good stuff. How long did you stop for? I've been doing it since 2004, mainly ring on 6 due to there being a lot of 6 bell towers up this way. I've covered to 2 triples quarters and trebled to 1, find rope sight much more difficult on 8 than 6. I've done one peal, plain bob minor inside, when my grandson was born - but didn't enjoy it and doubt whether I'll do any more.

I spent some time in hospital earlier this year so am steadily returnin - but taking it easy so as not to overdo it.

 :y
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 16 April 2017, 22:12:39
I stopped for about 26 years, mainly because my shifts were erratic. I promised myself that when I stopped shift work I'd take it up again.


I haven't rung any peals, and don't expect to; the combination of a bad back(from warehouse work and driving trucks) and a broken leg that healed 20mm short I doubt I could stand still for three and half hours.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Lincs Robert on 16 April 2017, 22:20:08
Well keep up the good work. I suspect that anyone else reading this will think we are talking swalahi!

If you find yourself up this way then PM me and you can grab a tower up here.

All the best ......
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: ronnyd on 16 April 2017, 22:45:25
My dear old Dad was a keen Campanologist.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Lincs Robert on 17 April 2017, 07:54:02
My dear old Dad was a keen Campanologist.

You could take it up. Never too late - I was 48 before I started  :y
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: ronnyd on 19 April 2017, 13:52:35
I,m 72 with a dodgy right arm. ;D
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Migv6 on 19 April 2017, 14:09:20
I'm 57 with dodgy everything. Just got some nasty chest pains carrying my trolley jack into my shed, so can add to the list now.  ::) ;D
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Lazydocker on 19 April 2017, 14:14:22
I'm 57 with dodgy everything. Just got some nasty chest pains carrying my trolley jack into my shed, so can add to the list now.  ::) ;D

57? Christ on a bike, you had a hard paper round :D :D :D

 :P  ::)
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Migv6 on 19 April 2017, 15:16:39
I'm 57 with dodgy everything. Just got some nasty chest pains carrying my trolley jack into my shed, so can add to the list now.  ::) ;D

57? Christ on a bike, you had a hard paper round life:D :D :D

 :P  ::)

Theres no denying it.  :(

 ;D ;D
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Lincs Robert on 19 April 2017, 18:29:19
I,m 72 with a dodgy right arm. ;D

Age is no problem, but you really need both arms!
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Doctor Gollum on 19 April 2017, 19:00:03
I,m 72 with a dodgy right arm. ;D

Age is no problem, but you really need both arms!
I can immediately think of two people here who might beg to differ... ;)
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Lincs Robert on 19 April 2017, 19:17:13
I,m 72 with a dodgy right arm. ;D

Age is no problem, but you really need both arms!
I can immediately think of two people here who might beg to differ... ;)

?
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 19 April 2017, 19:38:25
I,m 72 with a dodgy right arm. ;D

Age is no problem, but you really need both arms!
I can immediately think of two people here who might beg to differ... ;)


Are they ringers too?  :o
It's possible to ring one handed(it's possible to ring two bells at once, but very few people can do it), but I would suggest that most who do didn't learn that way.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Lincs Robert on 19 April 2017, 20:14:27
I,m 72 with a dodgy right arm. ;D

Age is no problem, but you really need both arms!
I can immediately think of two people here who might beg to differ... ;)


Are they ringers too?  :o
It's possible to ring one handed(it's possible to ring two bells at once, but very few people can do it), but I would suggest that most who do didn't learn that way.

I know someone who does this on a regular basis- frightens the hell out of me!
There was an episode of Midsomer which featured a ringing competition- ringers getting killed all round, in the end the winning team was a team of 3 people ringing 6 bells! The episode was called "ring our your dead".

I'm not sure what DG means & hope he will enlighten us .......
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Doctor Gollum on 19 April 2017, 20:40:54
Webby and Elite lover have a pair of hands between them ;)

Had forgotten that you were discussing campagnology :-[  ::)
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: STEMO on 19 April 2017, 20:47:22
Didn't know about Elite Lover, but you've got to take your hat off to young Webby. He just gets on with things, he's a good lad.

FFS....Don't tell him I said that.  :-X
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Migv6 on 19 April 2017, 20:54:47
Wot he said. ^  :y
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 02 July 2017, 21:39:54
I've been doing a lot of ringing recently so my workshop time has consisted of not making a clock ;D


But Richard's MGF project needs to move along, so he's bought some bits. These consist of three more displacers to repair/recharge, and because its got a head gasket issue we're going to upgrade it from the stock 118hp spec.


So, we have the head, cams, ECU and bigger throttle body off a 135hp car:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/k7r02jgitnjkiot/AsRemoved.jpg?dl=1)


These are supposed to benefit from matching the inlet ports to the manifold, and the impression on the gasket confirms that: stock ports:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/7r4j659uoydwgee/StockIntakePorts.jpg?dl=1)


and marked out:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/9xdfzwwmk9zlnyg/StockPort.jpg?dl=1)


About 20minutes with the die grinder:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/rf3vs8z737hjdto/EnlargedPorts.jpg?dl=1)


I also removed the step in the short turn near the valve seats as best I could. Once I've got some stones for the Dremel, I'll open up the holes for the water jacket too.


Finally for today, I cleaned up each valve in the lathe using some emery cloth and 400grit (no longer)sticky DA discs:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/i1fijm2kbrgbc3j/CleaningValve.jpg?dl=1)


I left my drill at work and I'm NOT lapping 16 valves by hand, so that can wait until Tuesday.


The last headwork I did was on a Lycoming engine; these K-series parts are tiny ;D
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: aaronjb on 03 July 2017, 12:13:35
But Richard's MGF project needs to move along, so he's bought some bits. These consist of three more displacers to repair/recharge, and because its got a head gasket issue we're going to upgrade it from the stock 118hp spec.

Surprise! ;)

Lathe envy, btw. Lathe envy. I bet your Warco has a lot less play in it than my Myfords :)
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 04 July 2017, 13:42:45

Lathe envy, btw. Lathe envy. I bet your Warco has a lot less play in it than my Myfords :)


I only bought it 3 1/2 years ago to replace a mini-lathe, so that had better be the case
The 5" centre height, 30mm spindle bore, 1100w variable speed motor and power cross-slide(which is particularly good for parting off) make it a lot more usable. Well worth the £1100 it cost, I wish I had space to upgrade the mini mill.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: aaronjb on 04 July 2017, 15:54:28
I know that's not particularly expensive for a lathe, but it's still the total cost of both my Myfords combined ;D That said, I'd get more use out of a single, expensive lathe than I would my Myfords, I suspect - especially one, which has pretty catastrophic play in the compound slide which leads to the tooling (esp. if carbide) 'digging' in on facing operations with interesting results!

Perhaps I should chop them both in (still a healthy market) for one newer one..

I'd still love an old Bridgeport, though  :D
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 11 November 2017, 19:20:48
I've made a number of bits for work, but they're just boring round stuff.


I have been acquiring some bits though:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/7i6yw93ckb1kinc/CNCparts%5B1%5D.jpg?dl=1)


That's a standalone 4 axis CNC controller, stepper motor, driver, coupling and mount plus a 12mm ballscrew with bearings. The rest of the bits are in the box behind. The plan was to get this


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/5d6kh4s7gq6sk7y/BareMill%5B1%5D.jpg?dl=1)


converted before Christmas, but I suspect the fettling of my new car will prevent that. The welding will probably start tomorrow.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: ronnyd on 11 November 2017, 21:03:41
Have you got a designated workshop Nick, or is it part of your garage? After a life of working on centre lathes and milling machines, i now don,t feel a need to start doing it in retirement. :D
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 11 November 2017, 21:19:42
Garage? Dedicated workshop? Off-road parking? What are they? ;D


My cars have always lived in the street, and my tools are in the cellar; which is home to  the fridge, freezer, storage, coats, indoor washing line and the door we use most of the time. I keep the MIG in the front porch, hydraulic press on the back court and a load of small stuff in the outside bog.


That's the real reason for converting the mini-mill to CNC, if I had the space I would buy a small turret mill for the productivity increase I'm after.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Mr Gav on 11 November 2017, 21:50:45
Garage? Dedicated workshop? Off-road parking? What are they? ;D


My cars have always lived in the street, and my tools are in the cellar; which is home to  the fridge, freezer, storage, coats, indoor washing line and the door we use most of the time. I keep the MIG in the front porch, hydraulic press on the back court and a load of small stuff in the outside bog.


That's the real reason for converting the mini-mill to CNC, if I had the space I would buy a small turret mill for the productivity increase I'm after.

I like your enthusiasm Nick, proper British back yard engineering  :y
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: ronnyd on 11 November 2017, 22:18:19
Garage? Dedicated workshop? Off-road parking? What are they? ;D


My cars have always lived in the street, and my tools are in the cellar; which is home to  the fridge, freezer, storage, coats, indoor washing line and the door we use most of the time. I keep the MIG in the front porch, hydraulic press on the back court and a load of small stuff in the outside bog.


That's the real reason for converting the mini-mill to CNC, if I had the space I would buy a small turret mill for the productivity increase I'm after.
Blimey, i admire your ingenuity  :o :y
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 15 November 2017, 12:01:55
I fitted a replacement battery to the new toy so it now starts on the button. Then I refitted all of the loose bits of dash that the PO hadn't bothered doing after installing a new heater matrix. I also connected the two hoses that he had joined together for some reason. Now the heater works, which is quite important in November.

I've also ordered a pair of sills to sort the crusty originals, and a bonnet latch so I can lose the hideous bonnet pins. Nor do I see any need for the radiator fan switch to be bypassed for a manual one; I'll buy a new switch to be sure and reinstate it. Taking chances with cooling on a K-series is bloody stupid.

I'd forgotten just how much fun small cars with decent size engines are, it's impossible to get out of this thing without a big smile.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: aaronjb on 15 November 2017, 12:12:18
Small car with K series..hmm..

Can't be an Elise, the sills are plastic fibreglass.
Can't be a Caterfield, there's no need for a heater in a car with no roof.

MGTF?
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 15 November 2017, 12:47:02
Small car with K series..hmm..

Can't be an Elise, the sills are plastic fibreglass.
Can't be a Caterfield, there's no need for a heater in a car with no roof.

MGTF?

No roof increases the need for a good heater!

Good guess on the MGTF, but wrong. I think the TF changes spoilt the earlier car. And it isn't one of those either.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: jimmy944 on 15 November 2017, 12:58:06
Left field suggestion:

Rover Tomcat with a targa roof?  :-\
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Field Marshal Dr. Opti on 15 November 2017, 13:00:45
Stimson Scorcher? :)
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 15 November 2017, 13:03:43
Left field suggestion:

Rover Tomcat with a targa roof?  :-\

I know where there is a good cheap one, but no. And I'd buy a turbo Astra coupe if in the market for that sort of thing.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: BazaJT on 15 November 2017, 18:44:52
Rover 75?
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 15 November 2017, 19:03:10
Rover 75?


Small car? And they're hardly suitable as a toy ;D
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 15 November 2017, 19:07:07
Stimson Scorcher? :)


I'm slightly disappointed that I had to google that.
It's certainly left field
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Doctor Gollum on 15 November 2017, 19:26:15
Metro or Maestro?
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 15 November 2017, 19:34:18
Metro or Maestro?


K-series in a Maestro seems like a lot of work, when the T-series turbo ought to be a bolt in. And I've had a Montego turbo.


No, it's this:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/f3p00f1hykanbz0/Metro%5B1%5D.jpg?dl=1)
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Migv6 on 15 November 2017, 20:10:02
Well, it isn't the ugliest car in your street. That's for certain.  ;D
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: STEMO on 15 November 2017, 20:46:51
I canít see your pictures, Nick, who are you using to host them?
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: YZ250 on 15 November 2017, 20:51:16
I canít see your pictures, Nick, who are you using to host them?

Dropbox...... but I can't see them either so I used the 'quote' button to find where they were hosted.   ;D

Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: STEMO on 15 November 2017, 20:59:45
I canít see your pictures, Nick, who are you using to host them?

Dropbox...... but I can't see them either so I used the 'quote' button to find where they were hosted.   ;D
:y

Sorry I looked now  ;D
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 15 November 2017, 21:03:32
Well, it isn't the ugliest car in your street. That's for certain.  ;D


When everybody is at home we've a fine supply of ugly: another Multipla, a Voyager, two 500s - one of them an L which competes with the Juke that another neighbour has just acquired, an Alfa and my mother's Focus. What we need is an aging Omega to add a touch of shabby gentility. No, there's one of those too ;D
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: aaronjb on 16 November 2017, 09:02:55
Good lord Nick.. I can only assume someone paid you to take it away? ;D

I had one, once, as a company car.. mine was the 1.4D devoid of any kind of power. Still managed to spin it into a ditch at 17, though that might have been because the front subframe was, prior to that event, two halves of a subframe no longer attached to each other.. only the best BL quality parts.

(I too can't see the pictures without playing the quote-the-post-copy-the-link-remove-the-end-bit game)
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: amba on 16 November 2017, 09:56:40
No pictures here either,and If I look out of the loft window I can almost see your road  ;D
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 16 November 2017, 10:03:05
Good lord Nick.. I can only assume someone paid you to take it away? ;D

I had one, once, as a company car.. mine was the 1.4D devoid of any kind of power. Still managed to spin it into a ditch at 17, though that might have been because the front subframe was, prior to that event, two halves of a subframe no longer attached to each other.. only the best BL quality parts.

(I too can't see the pictures without playing the quote-the-post-copy-the-link-remove-the-end-bit game)

Power isn't a problem, as it has the 1.8VVC engine. And all of the GTI suspension parts that are necessary for such conversions.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Doctor Gollum on 16 November 2017, 10:26:45
Thank God for that. Now I can see it, I am relieved to see that it isn't a purple cabriolet  :D
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Field Marshal Dr. Opti on 16 November 2017, 10:59:56
I canít see your pictures, Nick, who are you using to host them?

I'll help you out.

Nick has posted a picture of a beautiful blue Lamborghini. :)
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Doctor Gollum on 16 November 2017, 11:14:07
I canít see your pictures, Nick, who are you using to host them?

I'll help you out.

Nick has posted a picture of a beautiful blue Lamborghini. :)
Well... They weigh about the same :D
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: henryd on 16 November 2017, 11:55:48
Good lord Nick.. I can only assume someone paid you to take it away? ;D

I had one, once, as a company car.. mine was the 1.4D devoid of any kind of power. Still managed to spin it into a ditch at 17, though that might have been because the front subframe was, prior to that event, two halves of a subframe no longer attached to each other.. only the best BL quality parts.

(I too can't see the pictures without playing the quote-the-post-copy-the-link-remove-the-end-bit game)

Power isn't a problem, as it has the 1.8VVC engine. And all of the GTI suspension parts that are necessary for such conversions.

It must bloody tramp on with that motor in it :o :y
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Migv6 on 16 November 2017, 12:20:28
Good lord Nick.. I can only assume someone paid you to take it away? ;D

I had one, once, as a company car.. mine was the 1.4D devoid of any kind of power. Still managed to spin it into a ditch at 17, though that might have been because the front subframe was, prior to that event, two halves of a subframe no longer attached to each other.. only the best BL quality parts.

(I too can't see the pictures without playing the quote-the-post-copy-the-link-remove-the-end-bit game)

Power isn't a problem, as it has the 1.8VVC engine. And all of the GTI suspension parts that are necessary for such conversions.

It must bloody torque steer like crazy on with that motor in it :o :y

Fixed.  :D
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: STEMO on 16 November 2017, 12:34:10
Front wheel drive was once unthinkable with anything more than 250bhp, but there are quite a few cars which seem to go in a straight line with it nowadays.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Kevin Wood on 16 November 2017, 12:38:32
Front wheel drive was once unthinkable with anything more than 250bhp, but there are quite a few cars which seem to go in a straight line with it nowadays.

Yep, mostly when you're trying to negotiate a bend. ;)
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Doctor Gollum on 16 November 2017, 12:39:28
Front wheel drive was once unthinkable with anything more than 250bhp, but there are quite a few cars which seem to go in a straight line with it nowadays.
Only by using different length suspension components and  individual wheel braking to counter yaw ::)
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: STEMO on 16 November 2017, 12:59:24
Front wheel drive was once unthinkable with anything more than 250bhp, but there are quite a few cars which seem to go in a straight line with it nowadays.
Only by using different length suspension components and  individual wheel braking to counter yaw ::)
To counter my what?  :-\
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: aaronjb on 16 November 2017, 13:20:33
Front wheel drive was once unthinkable with anything more than 250bhp, but there are quite a few cars which seem to go in a straight line with it nowadays.
Only by using different length suspension components and  individual wheel braking to counter yaw ::)

Technically I'd say that any decent car suspension should have different length components - specifically the upper & lower wishbones; anything else is a packaging or financial compromise that results in sub-par handling ;)
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Field Marshal Dr. Opti on 16 November 2017, 13:36:00
Front wheel drive was once unthinkable with anything more than 250bhp, but there are quite a few cars which seem to go in a straight line with it nowadays.

Yep, mostly when you're trying to negotiate a bend. ;)

As a kid I had a Corgi model of the Oldsmobile Toronado from the mid sixties. A nice big 7 litre V8 driven through the front wheels. :y

Great looking car. :y
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 16 November 2017, 14:21:33
Front wheel drive was once unthinkable with anything more than 250bhp, but there are quite a few cars which seem to go in a straight line with it nowadays.

Yep, mostly when you're trying to negotiate a bend. ;)

As a kid I had a Corgi model of the Oldsmobile Toronado from the mid sixties. A nice big 7 litre V8 driven through the front wheels. :y

Great looking car. :y

Cadillac used the same gearbox with an 8.2l engine bolted to it. 400 lb/ft of torque from about 1000rpm.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Doctor Gollum on 16 November 2017, 14:23:54
Front wheel drive was once unthinkable with anything more than 250bhp, but there are quite a few cars which seem to go in a straight line with it nowadays.
Only by using different length suspension components and  individual wheel braking to counter yaw ::)
To counter my what?  :-\
The effect of torque steer on the rear axle ;)
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Field Marshal Dr. Opti on 16 November 2017, 15:01:30
Front wheel drive was once unthinkable with anything more than 250bhp, but there are quite a few cars which seem to go in a straight line with it nowadays.

Yep, mostly when you're trying to negotiate a bend. ;)

As a kid I had a Corgi model of the Oldsmobile Toronado from the mid sixties. A nice big 7 litre V8 driven through the front wheels. :y

Great looking car. :y

Cadillac used the same gearbox with an 8.2l engine bolted to it. 400 lb/ft of torque from about 1000rpm.

All it needed was Frank Cannon.....or was that a Lincoln Continental?
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 16 November 2017, 15:16:04
More like Boss Hogg
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 16 November 2017, 17:50:11

Power isn't a problem, as it has the 1.8VVC engine. And all of the GTI suspension parts that are necessary for such conversions.

It must bloody tramp on with that motor in it :o :y


You might think that; I couldn't possibly comment ::)
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 16 November 2017, 17:52:52
I canít see your pictures, Nick, who are you using to host them?

I'll help you out.

Nick has posted a picture of a beautiful blue Lamborghini. :)
Well... They weigh about the same :D


Metros are just over 800kg(not much more than a 'lightweight' Elise)
What Lamborghini gets even close to that?
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: aaronjb on 17 November 2017, 09:28:42
Metros are just over 800kg(not much more than a 'lightweight' Elise)
What Lamborghini gets even close to that?

Most will be within about 1000kg of that. Just. ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Doctor Gollum on 17 November 2017, 10:32:45
Metros are just over 800kg(not much more than a 'lightweight' Elise)
What Lamborghini gets even close to that?

Most will be within about 1000kg of that. Just. ;D ;D ;D
Especially the full fat Vorsprung durch essen versions  ;D

The Urraco P250 tips the scale at a mere 1,100 kgs which isn't bad considering that it's twice the size of the Metro :o
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: aaronjb on 17 November 2017, 10:57:04
Yup, sure I remember my friend with the Gallardo saying it's ~1800kg.

Doesn't feel it, mind, when you're driving it!
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 19 November 2017, 19:04:11
Made a start on the Metro.


This is NOT how to repair a rusty sill:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/rk13u8lj4unvgct/GrottySill.jpg?dl=1)


Especially as there's another rusty part near the front.


This is what is actually required after cutting out and repairing the grot in the floor:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/7scgndj809zs0nf/CutOffSill.jpg?dl=1)


A bit of tidying up, £45 and some clamps:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/s5uqj6q56dy3hvp/SillClampedOn.jpg?dl=1)


And run out of gas just when it's tacked on at the top, and plug welded along most of the bottom:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/qtwik4f01whvo30/SillTackedOn.jpg?dl=1)


So I ground down the welds that I did manage to do, put the car back on its wheels(it's in the street) and went to the pub. I bought it with the arch repair panel fitted like that; I would have fitted considerably less of it so as not to need so much filler to cover the distortion.


I'll get some more gas in the week so I can finish this repair and make a start on the other side which hopefully doesn't need any work to the floor.
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: biggriffin on 19 November 2017, 19:22:46
O dear. The race metro was a joy to work on( turbo)   :o  Next time your up nick will talk. :o
Title: Re: This Week in Wheeler's Workshop
Post by: Nick W on 26 November 2017, 19:05:11
A days work, and it looks just like it did when I bought it:


(https://www.dropbox.com/s/u7uj1va4n3dzrkz/SillFinished.jpg?dl=1)


I'll do the filler work and paint the whole side over Christmas.


The other side will be next weekends job.