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Chat Area => General Car Chat => Topic started by: Yodel-Odel-a-Eboy.com on 09 July 2019, 14:02:06

Title: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Yodel-Odel-a-Eboy.com on 09 July 2019, 14:02:06
Having retrieved the Battlebus this morning, I parked it on the road outside my house.  Now our road might not be very busy, but its also not very wide.

So Bimbo Brains, the daughter of the woman who lives nearly opposite, has just arrived home, and parked outside her house, essentially blocking the road.

What goes through the minds of Gen Z people?  FFS


Its our fault, this is the society with bred and cultured  >:(
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Yodel-Odel-a-Eboy.com on 09 July 2019, 14:11:07
I blame all this wank around school and "modern parenting", as the concept of right and wrong are lost.

"There are no losers at St Cuthberts" etc. Even on Sports Day. Somehow everyone wins the egg&spoon race.  And the Naughty Step.


If Bimbo Brains was my daughter, she'd have a bloody good hiding.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Migv6 le Frog Fan on 09 July 2019, 14:17:19
So self absorbed that the only thing in their thoughts is what they want to do at that particular instant. The world is full of them.
I agree its very much connected to modern parenting and schooling.
Bring on the cull.  :y
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Doctor Gollum on 09 July 2019, 14:22:23
Pop your dressing gown on and ask her if she can run you to the doctors as she is preventing you from getting in your car...

When she declines and moves her car, go back indoors ;D
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Yodel-Odel-a-Eboy.com on 09 July 2019, 14:34:38
She's buggered off now, so I suspect she only came home for a quick leg-over whilst her mum was out.

So she had the whole driveway to park on.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Migv6 le Frog Fan on 09 July 2019, 15:44:00
That would take a little extra effort on her part. Why would she bother, when she has nothing to gain from the extra effort ?
I was stood beside a father and his two young daughters in Eurocraprats on Saturday. He was trying to bribe them to quieten down and behave by promising them Mum would take them to the park later.
The older one - approx. 5 years old, wagged her finger at him, Beyoncé style, and said "no no no, that's a bad idea. You will take us to the park". When he informed her he would be fixing the car, she replied "you can do that tomorrow".
Im glad I wont be around to see that entitled generation running the world.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Yodel-Odel-a-Eboy.com on 09 July 2019, 15:50:30
That would take a little extra effort on her part. Why would she bother, when she has nothing to gain from the extra effort ?
I was stood beside a father and his two young daughters in Eurocraprats on Saturday. He was trying to bribe them to quieten down and behave by promising them Mum would take them to the park later.
The older one - approx. 5 years old, wagged her finger at him, Beyoncé style, and said "no no no, that's a bad idea. You will take us to the park". When he informed her he would be fixing the car, she replied "you can do that tomorrow".
Im glad I wont be around to see that entitled generation running the world.
Not that dad would have ever taken me to such an inappropriate place for a child, but if he did, and I'd done that, I can assure you I would have had a bad nosebleed.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Migv6 le Frog Fan on 09 July 2019, 16:27:34
I often spent time in scrapyards, motor factors with Dad and even helped bleeding brakes, when I was primary school age.
I assume I must have given him a bit of backchat once, as I remember being knocked into the middle of next week. I never did it again.  ;D
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: STEMO on 09 July 2019, 16:46:52
I often spent time in scrapyards, motor factors with Dad and even helped bleeding brakes, when I was primary school age.
I assume I must have given him a bit of backchat once, as I remember being knocked into the middle of next week. I never did it again.  ;D
I assumed you'd had several bangs to the head when you were young, Albs.  ;D
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Migv6 le Frog Fan on 09 July 2019, 17:06:26
You assumed correctly. One in particular in 1976 almost bloody killed me.  ::) ;D
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: STEMO on 09 July 2019, 17:30:49
You assumed correctly. One in particular in 1976 almost bloody killed me.  ::) ;D
Explains a lot. ;D
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Migv6 le Frog Fan on 09 July 2019, 18:00:49
At least I have an excuse.  :P ;D...……….and weren't you ever taught not to mock the afflicted ?  :D
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: biggriffin on 09 July 2019, 18:21:43
I blame all this wank around school and "modern parenting", as the concept of right and wrong are lost.

"There are no losers at St Cuthberts" etc. Even on Sports Day. Somehow everyone wins the egg&spoon race.  And the Naughty Step.


If Bimbo Brains was my daughter, she'd have a bloody good hiding.

Thought that was called interest. :)

Only happens in the fens then it's frowned upon.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Nick W on 09 July 2019, 18:31:49
At least I have an excuse.  :P ;D ...……….and weren't you ever taught not to mock the afflicted ?  :D




Yes.


But it's so tempting..........
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: STEMO on 09 July 2019, 18:42:00
At least I have an excuse.  :P ;D...……….and weren't you ever taught not to mock the afflicted ?  :D
No. In fact, it's a national sport, innit?  ;D
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: BazaJT on 09 July 2019, 19:12:42
Dad never worked on his cars[they were company cars]and in fact was usually too busy at work to take us anywhere much.But he-and mum=taught us manners and respect.Back chatting,making demands,issuing orders were definitely on the no-no list and would be met with instant and severe punishment.If you tried it once you didn't really want to go back for a second helping.I loved them both dearly and miss them to this day!
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Doctor Gollum on 09 July 2019, 21:49:26
At least I have an excuse.  :P ;D...……….and weren't you ever taught not to mock the afflicted ?  :D
No. In fact, it's a national sport, innit?  ;D
Not at all  ::) it's only a sport if it's a challenge...
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Yodel-Odel-a-Eboy.com on 11 July 2019, 09:59:45
I blame all this wank around school and "modern parenting", as the concept of right and wrong are lost.

"There are no losers at St Cuthberts" etc. Even on Sports Day. Somehow everyone wins the egg&spoon race.  And the Naughty Step.


If Bimbo Brains was my daughter, she'd have a bloody good hiding.

Thought that was called interest. :)

Only happens in the fens then it's frowned upon.
I assume you mean incest. But, nah, she ain't pretty (but thinks she is)
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Field Marshal Dr. Opti on 11 July 2019, 17:36:01
I blame all this wank around school and "modern parenting", as the concept of right and wrong are lost.

"There are no losers at St Cuthberts" etc. Even on Sports Day. Somehow everyone wins the egg&spoon race.  And the Naughty Step.


If Bimbo Brains was my daughter, she'd have a bloody good hiding.

Finishing 9th in the sack race or egg and spoon race means you are not a loser. :)

 
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Field Marshal Dr. Opti on 11 July 2019, 17:37:55
.....because you get a 'well done ' certificate. :y
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Migv6 le Frog Fan on 11 July 2019, 17:42:26
Ron Dennis used to have a sign on his desk "winning isn't everything. Its the only thing."
Senna used to say he hated coming second as that was juast the first of the losers.
Dont know what will become of the world if those attitudes disappear.  ::)
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: STEMO on 11 July 2019, 19:52:21
Ron Dennis used to have a sign on his desk "winning isn't everything. Its the only thing."
Senna used to say he hated coming second as that was juast the first of the losers.
Dont know what will become of the world if those attitudes disappear.  ::)
They have, many years ago.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Migv6 le Frog Fan on 11 July 2019, 19:58:21
Theres still a bit of it left. There was when I had a kid in an old VW Polo up my chuff on the way to work today on B roads.
I left him in a cloud of curry fumes.  :y ;D
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Jimmy944 on 11 July 2019, 20:43:03
Ron Dennis used to have a sign on his desk "winning isn't everything. Its the only thing."
Senna used to say he hated coming second as that was juast the first of the losers.
Dont know what will become of the world if those attitudes disappear.  ::)
They have, many years ago.

I rather fear we're already past the point of no return. I noticed that a former university friend of mine, now working for some quasi-private-sector part of the NHS at the ripe ol' age of 37 posted pictures of herself at some swanky gala type event, black tie etc. And she had won an award, proper glass plaque and everything. Zoom in, yup, its a participation award, for the project she's working on.

That's right, just doing your fu£king job seems to be worthy of an award these days.  >:(.

While not as old learned as some folk on here, I was educated at a time when the results went up on noticeboards, and I damn straight used to get a bolocking if my name wasn't near the top. Its one of the worst failings of the British state education system today, it teaches kids the fallacy that there are riches for all, no matter how hard you (don't) try. Then suddenly they leave education, and are expected to compete with people from other cultures, or those educated at public school, who know damn well its a competition and have had 18yrs practice at trying to climb to the top of the heap.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Bigron on 11 July 2019, 20:51:07
I taught at a further education college for 20 years and the mainly school leavers intake were those who had pi55ed about at school and left unqualified - then found themselves to be unemployable. That left my colleagues and me to repair the damage and try to fit them for the real world!  >:(

Ron.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: STEMO on 11 July 2019, 21:05:30
And here's our next scandal in this greedy, money oriented sector. From the bbc news:

The proportion of students in England awarded first-class degrees continues to increase - rising by 80% since 2010-11, the university watchdog says.
The Office for Students, warning of grade inflation, says for almost three-quarters of universities such increases in top grades are "unexplained".
The University of Surrey increased its proportion awarded first-class degrees from 23% to 47% of students.
Education Secretary Damian Hinds warned against "unfair practices".
"Worries about grade inflation threaten to devalue a university education in the eyes of employers and potential students," said Susan Lapworth, director of competition for the Office for Students.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Bigron on 11 July 2019, 21:35:45
"Everybody has won and all must have prizes", said the Dodo!

Ron.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Sir Tigger QC on 11 July 2019, 22:37:58
That's right, just doing your fu£king job seems to be worthy of an award these days.  >:(.

Quite common within the establishment/public sector/military where all the senior civil servants get knighthoods and some get peerages.  ::)

An old school mate of mine joined the navy at 18 as an officer cadet and left at 45 with the rank of Commander, an OBE, a big fat pension and even his kids school fees paid up until they left school!  :y 

What did he do to get his OBE?  ???  His job!  ;D
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Bigron on 11 July 2019, 22:43:58
Yes, and look at the number of undeserving "celebrities" who get knighthoods: all they do is their jobs.

Ron.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: aaronjb on 12 July 2019, 08:34:27
I'll just leave this here: https://www.techtimes.com/articles/230241/20180614/iq-scores-dropping-since-the-1970s-are-people-getting-dumber.htm
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: STEMO on 12 July 2019, 10:34:22
I'll just leave this here: https://www.techtimes.com/articles/230241/20180614/iq-scores-dropping-since-the-1970s-are-people-getting-dumber.htm
Is there an audio version of that?  ;D
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Rods2 on 12 July 2019, 19:33:50
Having retrieved the Battlebus this morning, I parked it on the road outside my house.  Now our road might not be very busy, but its also not very wide.

So Bimbo Brains, the daughter of the woman who lives nearly opposite, has just arrived home, and parked outside her house, essentially blocking the road.

What goes through the minds of Gen Z people?  FFS


Its our fault, this is the society with bred and cultured  >:(

How incoderate...

..that she didn't put her hazard 'I know I'm inconsiderately parked & have blocked the road, but I'm far too important to worry about trifles like that' lights on. ::)
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Bigron on 12 July 2019, 20:07:03
It's worth remembering that women's brains are four ounces lighter than men's, so it wasn't really her fault, poor dear!

Ron.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: ronnyd on 12 July 2019, 20:48:24
It's worth remembering that women's brains are four ounces lighter than men's, so it wasn't really her fault, poor dear!

Ron.
Paging Lizzie?  ;D ;D
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: dave the builder on 13 July 2019, 09:19:49
It's worth remembering that women's brains are four ounces lighter than men's, so it wasn't really her fault, poor dear!

Ron.
We've gone METRIC now Ron ,it was in the papers  :y
The 114 Grams they lack is only the common sense and logic parts ,nothing important  :P
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Yodel-Odel-a-Eboy.com on 13 July 2019, 10:38:26
And here's our next scandal in this greedy, money oriented sector. From the bbc news:

The proportion of students in England awarded first-class degrees continues to increase - rising by 80% since 2010-11, the university watchdog says.
The Office for Students, warning of grade inflation, says for almost three-quarters of universities such increases in top grades are "unexplained".
The University of Surrey increased its proportion awarded first-class degrees from 23% to 47% of students.
Education Secretary Damian Hinds warned against "unfair practices".
"Worries about grade inflation threaten to devalue a university education in the eyes of employers and potential students," said Susan Lapworth, director of competition for the Office for Students.
The degree itself has become worthless*, in that everybody has them now, so can't really be used as a method to paper sift.  I suspect the same has started to happen to 1st's.


*Only essential, because they are so common, you need one to get an interview even in industries that have never needed them before, such as retail and so on
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Yodel-Odel-a-Eboy.com on 13 July 2019, 10:39:40
It's worth remembering that women's brains are four ounces lighter than men's, so it wasn't really her fault, poor dear!

Ron.
Her tits probably make up for it
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Shackeng on 13 July 2019, 20:02:28
That's right, just doing your fu£king job seems to be worthy of an award these days.  >:(.

Quite common within the establishment/public sector/military where all the senior civil servants get knighthoods and some get peerages.  ::)

An old school mate of mine joined the navy at 18 as an officer cadet and left at 45 with the rank of Commander, an OBE, a big fat pension and even his kids school fees paid up until they left school!  :y 

What did he do to get his OBE?  ???  His job!  ;D

Assuming he served for 27 years, its only about 33K. Not exactly a fortune these days, and perhaps he did a good job serving his country, almost certainly seeing combat in one or more of our many skirmishes over the past 40 odd years. Good on him, and those like him who are willing to put their lives on the line for the rest of us. :y
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Jimmy944 on 13 July 2019, 21:49:17
While I don't doubt those who serve our country deserve recognition. To say an annuity of £33k isnt much is a bit strong. Outside of the public sector, you'd want the best part of £750k to buy that pension, and that's without index linking, spousal benefits and all the other niceties the public sector chuck around like they're freebies.

On the open market you'd probably have to have getting on £850k to buy the equivalent. Takes some saving on "only" 27yrs.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: biggriffin on 13 July 2019, 22:46:46
It's worth remembering that women's brains are four ounces lighter than men's, so it wasn't really her fault, poor dear!

Ron.
Her tits probably make up for it
[/quote
]
This comment is worthless without pictures.. ;)
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Sir Tigger QC on 14 July 2019, 01:53:53
That's right, just doing your fu£king job seems to be worthy of an award these days.  >:(.

Quite common within the establishment/public sector/military where all the senior civil servants get knighthoods and some get peerages.  ::)

An old school mate of mine joined the navy at 18 as an officer cadet and left at 45 with the rank of Commander, an OBE, a big fat pension and even his kids school fees paid up until they left school!  :y 

What did he do to get his OBE?  ???  His job!  ;D

Assuming he served for 27 years, its only about 33K. Not exactly a fortune these days, and perhaps he did a good job serving his country, almost certainly seeing combat in one or more of our many skirmishes over the past 40 odd years. Good on him, and those like him who are willing to put their lives on the line for the rest of us. :y

I'm not slagging my mate off Shack and you are right, I'm sure he has put his life on the line at times during his naval career. He was a naval diver and worked in the RN bomb disposal team for a while, so doubtless during that part of his career was in some dicey situations above and below sea level. During the Iraq war he commanded a flotilla of minesweepers in the gulf and no doubt saw action there. So he had a very successful career, but at the end of the day he got the OBE for doing his job!  :)

As to his pension, I'll take your figure of £33k and if he lives to 85 his pension pot is worth £1.3 million, which as Jimmy points out is very generous. A quick Google though suggests that the salary of a RN Commander is between £85-95k and given he joined about 1986, I'd have thought his pension would be more than £33k.  :-\  Nor can I think of many jobs where your employer will pay for your kids private education!  ;)

However, you're a military man and I'm not so I accept you know more about this sort of thing than me. :y
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: BazaJT on 14 July 2019, 08:40:33
I don't begrudge any of our forces personnel their pensions.one of my sons-in-law joined the army as a boy soldier and retired in his mid thirties during his "stint" he did at least 3 tours in N.ireland was in the Falklands,Desert Storm and Afghanistan[these are the ones I know of]however O.B.E.s/Knighthoods-deserved or not- seem to get scattered about like confetti to all and sundry these days.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Yodel-Odel-a-Eboy.com on 14 July 2019, 10:23:47
While I don't doubt those who serve our country deserve recognition. To say an annuity of £33k isnt much is a bit strong. Outside of the public sector, you'd want the best part of £750k to buy that pension, and that's without index linking, spousal benefits and all the other niceties the public sector chuck around like they're freebies.

On the open market you'd probably have to have getting on £850k to buy the equivalent. Takes some saving on "only" 27yrs.
I agree on all counts.  £33k is an absolute pipe dream for me, even including my, now frozen, 15yrs of DB pension. Despite the very high percentage I pay into my DC pensions.

The general view on (pure annuity only) pots is for each £100k of savings gives around £3-4k of annual pension for someone my age (sub 50) with an estimated retirement age of 67.  So for £33k, I'd need a pot of just over £1m.  And a near decade of global recession, and another generation of low growth due to all the EU snafu, investments aren't likely to grow, so it has to be pure savings.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Shackeng on 14 July 2019, 11:10:34
That's right, just doing your fu£king job seems to be worthy of an award these days.  >:(.

Quite common within the establishment/public sector/military where all the senior civil servants get knighthoods and some get peerages.  ::)

An old school mate of mine joined the navy at 18 as an officer cadet and left at 45 with the rank of Commander, an OBE, a big fat pension and even his kids school fees paid up until they left school!  :y 

What did he do to get his OBE?  ???  His job!  ;D

Assuming he served for 27 years, its only about 33K. Not exactly a fortune these days, and perhaps he did a good job serving his country, almost certainly seeing combat in one or more of our many skirmishes over the past 40 odd years. Good on him, and those like him who are willing to put their lives on the line for the rest of us. :y

I'm not slagging my mate off Shack and you are right, I'm sure he has put his life on the line at times during his naval career. He was a naval diver and worked in the RN bomb disposal team for a while, so doubtless during that part of his career was in some dicey situations above and below sea level. During the Iraq war he commanded a flotilla of minesweepers in the gulf and no doubt saw action there. So he had a very successful career, but at the end of the day he got the OBE for doing his job!  :)

As to his pension, I'll take your figure of £33k and if he lives to 85 his pension pot is worth £1.3 million, which as Jimmy points out is very generous. A quick Google though suggests that the salary of a RN Commander is between £85-95k and given he joined about 1986, I'd have thought his pension would be more than £33k.  :-\  Nor can I think of many jobs where your employer will pay for your kids private education!  ;)

However, you're a military man and I'm not so I accept you know more about this sort of thing than me. :y

Point taken on the pension, although personally I don't think you can put a price on what some of our servicemen went through - I do not include myself here, I served during the cold war and never saw a shot fired - but I do agree with the principle of awards degradation. Sir Andy Murray! for playing a game he loves, and earns £M for doing so. Dame Judy Dench! for being a celebrity actOR, and also earning £M. I have no problem with your mate, who sounds like a brave and competent man, getting his, no doubt well deserved, OBE. :y
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: STEMO on 14 July 2019, 11:11:00
I couldn't help noticing how much my wife's pension increased over the last seven years of service. It creeps up slowly to age 60, when she would get an annual pension of £38000 and a lump sum of £49000. Then it jumps up quite dramatically, £44,500@62, £52,600@64 and £68,000@67. The lump sum stays the same as that is part of the, now closed, final salary.

Please explain, Jimmy.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: STEMO on 14 July 2019, 11:36:21
I couldn't help noticing how much my wife's pension increased over the last seven years of service. It creeps up slowly to age 60, when she would get an annual pension of £38000 and a lump sum of £49000. Then it jumps up quite dramatically, £44,500@62, £52,600@64 and £68,000@67. The lump sum stays the same as that is part of the, now closed, final salary.

Please explain, Jimmy.
Pity I won't be around to see it  :(
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Doctor Gollum on 14 July 2019, 11:56:31
Compound interest.  :y

At 7% it doubles every 10 years, at 10% it's every 7 years.

Rather than simply trying to save your retirement fund, invest it in good mutual funds and reinvest any dividends.

Paying the mortgage off and have no other credit payments allows you to invest any cash that would otherwise be paying to creditors and get it working for you.

 8)
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: STEMO on 14 July 2019, 12:30:18
Compound interest.  :y

At 7% it doubles every 10 years, at 10% it's every 7 years.

Rather than simply trying to save your retirement fund, invest it in good mutual funds and reinvest any dividends.

Paying the mortgage off and have no other credit payments allows you to invest any cash that would otherwise be paying to creditors and get it working for you.

 8)
If that reply was for me, it's well wide of the mark. Wifey pays just short of 12% of her wages into teachers pension, her employer pays just over 13%, so 25% going into her fund.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Doctor Gollum on 14 July 2019, 12:35:48
Compound interest.  :y

At 7% it doubles every 10 years, at 10% it's every 7 years.

Rather than simply trying to save your retirement fund, invest it in good mutual funds and reinvest any dividends.

Paying the mortgage off and have no other credit payments allows you to invest any cash that would otherwise be paying to creditors and get it working for you.

 8)
If that reply was for me, it's well wide of the mark. Wifey pays just short of 12% of her wages into teachers pension, her employer pays just over 13%, so 25% going into her fund.
https://www.thecalculatorsite.com/finance/calculators/compoundinterestcalculator.php

Put that amount into a compound interest calculator with the growth rate of the pot and see what happens with over time.

Put the number of years to match how long to the older age that she might retire and you'll be able to back track to the younger... The pot difference might surprise you ;)
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: STEMO on 14 July 2019, 12:53:32
Compound interest.  :y

At 7% it doubles every 10 years, at 10% it's every 7 years.

Rather than simply trying to save your retirement fund, invest it in good mutual funds and reinvest any dividends.

Paying the mortgage off and have no other credit payments allows you to invest any cash that would otherwise be paying to creditors and get it working for you.

 8)
If that reply was for me, it's well wide of the mark. Wifey pays just short of 12% of her wages into teachers pension, her employer pays just over 13%, so 25% going into her fund.
https://www.thecalculatorsite.com/finance/calculators/compoundinterestcalculator.php

Put that amount into a compound interest calculator with the growth rate of the pot and see what happens with over time.

Put the number of years to match how long to the older age that she might retire and you'll be able to back track to the younger... The pot difference might surprise you ;)
You not getting it. If she didn't pay into the teachers pension, she'd lose the employers contribution.
There is absolutely no way that a public service pension can be beaten by investment in the markets.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Doctor Gollum on 14 July 2019, 13:02:56
If they didn't match it and she put 25% away, what would the difference be?
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: STEMO on 14 July 2019, 13:15:25
If they didn't match it and she put 25% away, what would the difference be?
What? The difference would be that it would cost her twice as much...of course. ::)
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Doctor Gollum on 14 July 2019, 14:41:24
If they didn't match it and she put 25% away, what would the difference be?
What? The difference would be that it would cost her twice as much...of course. ::)
Exactly, my point being, that with some thought people could realistically (easily even) put away 25%, especially with no mortgage payments.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: STEMO on 14 July 2019, 14:44:25
If they didn't match it and she put 25% away, what would the difference be?
What? The difference would be that it would cost her twice as much...of course. ::)
Exactly, my point being, that with some thought people could realistically (easily even) put away 25%, especially with no mortgage payments.
You don't give up, do you? If your post was in reply to mine, which it obviously was as we're having this conversation, then your premise is utter bollix. So now you've changed it to 'some people'.
Learn to put your hands up when you're wrong, Al.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Yodel-Odel-a-Eboy.com on 14 July 2019, 16:06:24
And if it was to me, my+employer contributions are way higher than 25%. And still predicting that I will be reliant on the state pension, if such a thing still exists in 18 years.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Doctor Gollum on 14 July 2019, 17:26:08
If I put away 25% and I assume it averages 8% growth*, until 67, that gives me a fund of £836,600, lose the £49k and draw a salary of £62k a year, then I get to 92 years old with £210k to my name having had a monthly income of £5,200.

And that's without a match.

What have I missed?

Current pot is at 11% in 10 months so don't think an average of 8% is out of line.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: STEMO on 14 July 2019, 18:03:21
My missus will be close to, or over, the lifetime allowance, so she couldn't really do any better.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Jimmy944 on 15 July 2019, 00:05:07
I couldn't help noticing how much my wife's pension increased over the last seven years of service. It creeps up slowly to age 60, when she would get an annual pension of £38000 and a lump sum of £49000. Then it jumps up quite dramatically, £44,500@62, £52,600@64 and £68,000@67. The lump sum stays the same as that is part of the, now closed, final salary.

Please explain, Jimmy.


I think its probably a product of a couple of things. Firstly, every year past 60 your OH isn't retired, means its a year "saved" as far as the pension company is concerned.  The pension company will predict she has about 25yrs to live at age 60 (life expectancy 85 is about the going rate for someone age 60 today I think). So, if she stays in work 2 more years they will split the money she would have received in those 2 yrs over the remaining 23 of her assumed life. £38,000 x 2 / 23 = about an extra £3,300 per yr.

Secondly, they're investing that £38,000 x 2 = £76,000  for an extra 2 yrs (plus her £49,000 lump sum that she hasn't drawn down) at say 8% return, there's another £22000 ish to spread over the 23 yrs they'll be paying her £22000 / 23 = circa £900 p.a.

Finally,  she's also contributing for those two years. Assuming she earns £60,000, that means there's an extra £60,000 x 25% x 2 = £30,000 to split over the 23 yrs, giving an extra £1300 per yr.

Adding these gets you to £43,500.

Clearly, I'm still a grand short, so I'm guessing the pension benefits are index linked in some way? If you find out what inflation rate they use for the benefits, it will probably get you to £44,500.

Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Jimmy944 on 15 July 2019, 00:11:55
While I don't doubt those who serve our country deserve recognition. To say an annuity of £33k isnt much is a bit strong. Outside of the public sector, you'd want the best part of £750k to buy that pension, and that's without index linking, spousal benefits and all the other niceties the public sector chuck around like they're freebies.

On the open market you'd probably have to have getting on £850k to buy the equivalent. Takes some saving on "only" 27yrs.
I agree on all counts.  £33k is an absolute pipe dream for me, even including my, now frozen, 15yrs of DB pension. Despite the very high percentage I pay into my DC pensions.

The general view on (pure annuity only) pots is for each £100k of savings gives around £3-4k of annual pension for someone my age (sub 50) with an estimated retirement age of 67.  So for £33k, I'd need a pot of just over £1m.  And a near decade of global recession, and another generation of low growth due to all the EU snafu, investments aren't likely to grow, so it has to be pure savings.

I have to agree, I've taken the view that for every pound that goes in, I'm not giving 40p to the tax man and my employer puts in a quid, so all I want is for my investments to keep pace with inflation.

I've set a personal goal of being 'on the beach' at 55, (assuming no children) but if I'm going to get the job done in the 20.5yrs that I have left, I see either Buy to Let or a side line in house renovation as my only options to get there. Ask an IFA for an index linked annuity starting at age 55 and most of them will pi$$ themselves laughing.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: STEMO on 15 July 2019, 06:19:28
I couldn't help noticing how much my wife's pension increased over the last seven years of service. It creeps up slowly to age 60, when she would get an annual pension of £38000 and a lump sum of £49000. Then it jumps up quite dramatically, £44,500@62, £52,600@64 and £68,000@67. The lump sum stays the same as that is part of the, now closed, final salary.

Please explain, Jimmy.


I think its probably a product of a couple of things. Firstly, every year past 60 your OH isn't retired, means its a year "saved" as far as the pension company is concerned.  The pension company will predict she has about 25yrs to live at age 60 (life expectancy 85 is about the going rate for someone age 60 today I think). So, if she stays in work 2 more years they will split the money she would have received in those 2 yrs over the remaining 23 of her assumed life. £38,000 x 2 / 23 = about an extra £3,300 per yr.

Secondly, they're investing that £38,000 x 2 = £76,000  for an extra 2 yrs (plus her £49,000 lump sum that she hasn't drawn down) at say 8% return, there's another £22000 ish to spread over the 23 yrs they'll be paying her £22000 / 23 = circa £900 p.a.

Finally,  she's also contributing for those two years. Assuming she earns £60,000, that means there's an extra £60,000 x 25% x 2 = £30,000 to split over the 23 yrs, giving an extra £1300 per yr.

Adding these gets you to £43,500.

Clearly, I'm still a grand short, so I'm guessing the pension benefits are index linked in some way? If you find out what inflation rate they use for the benefits, it will probably get you to £44,500.
Thank you.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: aaronjb on 15 July 2019, 08:29:45
*looks at pension pot*

I guess I'll be retiring at 120.

My employer (in line with most, I think) only matches up to 5%, so even if I'm putting ~12% in that's only going to get me 17%. That teacher's pension looks pretty attractive.

.. not attractive enough to be in charge of 30+ other peoples screaming little s**tbags, though ;D
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: jonathanh on 15 July 2019, 08:44:33
I couldn't help noticing how much my wife's pension increased over the last seven years of service. It creeps up slowly to age 60, when she would get an annual pension of £38000 and a lump sum of £49000. Then it jumps up quite dramatically, £44,500@62, £52,600@64 and £68,000@67. The lump sum stays the same as that is part of the, now closed, final salary.

Please explain, Jimmy.


I think its probably a product of a couple of things. Firstly, every year past 60 your OH isn't retired, means its a year "saved" as far as the pension company is concerned.  The pension company will predict she has about 25yrs to live at age 60 (life expectancy 85 is about the going rate for someone age 60 today I think). So, if she stays in work 2 more years they will split the money she would have received in those 2 yrs over the remaining 23 of her assumed life. £38,000 x 2 / 23 = about an extra £3,300 per yr.

Secondly, they're investing that £38,000 x 2 = £76,000  for an extra 2 yrs (plus her £49,000 lump sum that she hasn't drawn down) at say 8% return, there's another £22000 ish to spread over the 23 yrs they'll be paying her £22000 / 23 = circa £900 p.a.

Finally,  she's also contributing for those two years. Assuming she earns £60,000, that means there's an extra £60,000 x 25% x 2 = £30,000 to split over the 23 yrs, giving an extra £1300 per yr.

Adding these gets you to £43,500.

Clearly, I'm still a grand short, so I'm guessing the pension benefits are index linked in some way? If you find out what inflation rate they use for the benefits, it will probably get you to £44,500.

in this case I think the pension company is the teachers pension scheme (STEMO can confirm) so there really isn't a company involved.  Also as it is unfunded they are not " investing" anything. having said that, that's the kind of logic the Government actuary will apply to work out the late retirement factors
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Yodel-Odel-a-Eboy.com on 15 July 2019, 10:27:05

Current pot is at 11% in 10 months so don't think an average of 8% is out of line.
I think you'll find over a longer period, that will be far less sustainable.  Which is why the FCS says that investment companies have to show growth rates of between 4 and 8%, with long term being somewhere in the middle.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: STEMO on 15 July 2019, 11:08:44
I couldn't help noticing how much my wife's pension increased over the last seven years of service. It creeps up slowly to age 60, when she would get an annual pension of £38000 and a lump sum of £49000. Then it jumps up quite dramatically, £44,500@62, £52,600@64 and £68,000@67. The lump sum stays the same as that is part of the, now closed, final salary.

Please explain, Jimmy.


I think its probably a product of a couple of things. Firstly, every year past 60 your OH isn't retired, means its a year "saved" as far as the pension company is concerned.  The pension company will predict she has about 25yrs to live at age 60 (life expectancy 85 is about the going rate for someone age 60 today I think). So, if she stays in work 2 more years they will split the money she would have received in those 2 yrs over the remaining 23 of her assumed life. £38,000 x 2 / 23 = about an extra £3,300 per yr.

Secondly, they're investing that £38,000 x 2 = £76,000  for an extra 2 yrs (plus her £49,000 lump sum that she hasn't drawn down) at say 8% return, there's another £22000 ish to spread over the 23 yrs they'll be paying her £22000 / 23 = circa £900 p.a.

Finally,  she's also contributing for those two years. Assuming she earns £60,000, that means there's an extra £60,000 x 25% x 2 = £30,000 to split over the 23 yrs, giving an extra £1300 per yr.

Adding these gets you to £43,500.

Clearly, I'm still a grand short, so I'm guessing the pension benefits are index linked in some way? If you find out what inflation rate they use for the benefits, it will probably get you to £44,500.

in this case I think the pension company is the teachers pension scheme (STEMO can confirm) so there really isn't a company involved.  Also as it is unfunded they are not " investing" anything. having said that, that's the kind of logic the Government actuary will apply to work out the late retirement factors
Yes, Jonathan. Malcolm has explained to me in the past that there is no 'pot', it is merely a government 'promise to pay'.
That's a teeny weeny bit scary, actually  ;D
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: STEMO on 15 July 2019, 11:16:59
So, basically, it's like the state pension. Current contributors are paying the pensions of retirees and my wife's pension is funded by payments from future contributions. I can see lots of ways that it could go very wrong, but I can see even more ways that the student loans could go wrong and the bill for that one could run into hundreds of billions. The government will sit back waiting for all the repayments to come in, and they won't...they just won't.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Jimmy944 on 15 July 2019, 12:30:32
Its one of those things, you (quite literally) pays your money and takes your choice.

Your OH has to trust the UK government with her retirement, I have to trust a fund manager who I know would see me penniless before putting his yacht or villa in Tuscany at risk  ;D
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Doctor Gollum on 15 July 2019, 12:42:46

Current pot is at 11% in 10 months so don't think an average of 8% is out of line.
I think you'll find over a longer period, that will be far less sustainable.  Which is why the FCS says that investment companies have to show growth rates of between 4 and 8%, with long term being somewhere in the middle.
You can pretty much guarantee 8% without even trying...

https://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/042415/what-average-annual-return-sp-500.asp
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: STEMO on 15 July 2019, 12:47:50

Current pot is at 11% in 10 months so don't think an average of 8% is out of line.
I think you'll find over a longer period, that will be far less sustainable.  Which is why the FCS says that investment companies have to show growth rates of between 4 and 8%, with long term being somewhere in the middle.
You can pretty much guarantee 8% without even trying...

https://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/042415/what-average-annual-return-sp-500.asp
I disagree, but I'm not going to get into a discussion about it. We'll just have to wait and see if you're a rich pensioner........or not.  :)
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: aaronjb on 15 July 2019, 12:50:11
You can pretty much guarantee 8% without even trying...

https://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/042415/what-average-annual-return-sp-500.asp

My pension fund(s) would disagree .. one swings between 0% and 4% annual return, another is about 6-8% and the third (smallest, riskiest) swings wildly between 15% and -5%... (those are all BlackRock managed)
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Jimmy944 on 15 July 2019, 12:50:15


Current pot is at 11% in 10 months so don't think an average of 8% is out of line.
I think you'll find over a longer period, that will be far less sustainable.  Which is why the FCS says that investment companies have to show growth rates of between 4 and 8%, with long term being somewhere in the middle.
You can pretty much guarantee 8% without even trying...

https://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/042415/what-average-annual-return-sp-500.asp

Only really in the equity market though. And it's generally accepted that equities are too volatile for a pension portfolio, particularly as you get closer to retirement.

A more common split would be 30% equities, 45% bonds, 25% cash (gov't gilts) in the decade running up to retirement.

You're running considerable downside risk with an equity heavy portfolio.  :y
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: STEMO on 15 July 2019, 12:52:08
You can pretty much guarantee 8% without even trying...

https://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/042415/what-average-annual-return-sp-500.asp

My pension fund(s) would disagree .. one swings between 0% and 4% annual return, another is about 6-8% and the third (smallest, riskiest) swings wildly between 15% and -5%... (those are all BlackRock managed)
Good job Bill Gross left or you'd be penniless.  ;D
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: STEMO on 15 July 2019, 13:00:31
I think my pension strategy wipes the floor with any of those mentioned previously. Look for someone twenty years younger than you, check out their earnings potential and, if it all adds up, marry them.   ;D
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Jimmy944 on 15 July 2019, 13:01:13
You can pretty much guarantee 8% without even trying...

https://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/042415/what-average-annual-return-sp-500.asp

My pension fund(s) would disagree .. one swings between 0% and 4% annual return, another is about 6-8% and the third (smallest, riskiest) swings wildly between 15% and -5%... (those are all BlackRock managed)

I'm in the highest risk portfolio that standard Life offered our scheme and that's only 55% equity. Even that has swung between -15% and +23% over the last 5yrs  :o.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: STEMO on 15 July 2019, 13:03:58
You can pretty much guarantee 8% without even trying...

https://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/042415/what-average-annual-return-sp-500.asp

My pension fund(s) would disagree .. one swings between 0% and 4% annual return, another is about 6-8% and the third (smallest, riskiest) swings wildly between 15% and -5%... (those are all BlackRock managed)

I'm in the highest risk portfolio that standard Life offered our scheme and that's only 55% equity. Even that has swung between -15% and +23% over the last 5yrs  :o.
I just couldn't live with that uncertainty. Sleepless nights and all that. But.......you'll find that doesn't kick in till you're in your fifties, that's when you start to fret.........about everything really.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Doctor Gollum on 15 July 2019, 13:26:32

Current pot is at 11% in 10 months so don't think an average of 8% is out of line.
I think you'll find over a longer period, that will be far less sustainable.  Which is why the FCS says that investment companies have to show growth rates of between 4 and 8%, with long term being somewhere in the middle.
You can pretty much guarantee 8% without even trying...

https://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/042415/what-average-annual-return-sp-500.asp
I disagree, but I'm not going to get into a discussion about it. We'll just have to wait and see if you're a rich pensioner........or not.  :)
I'll let you know... We're destined to end up in the same firey pit :D
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Doctor Gollum on 15 July 2019, 13:34:44
Mine's all mutual funds in a SIPP with effectively zero bonds and minimal cash or European exposure.

My small, ie six months worth, DC pension hasn't grown since I got it two years ago. Make of that what you will. I would move it to the SIPP and make it work some, but sadly it's stuck in its own place...
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Yodel-Odel-a-Eboy.com on 15 July 2019, 13:36:35
One of my (high growth) pension pots lost an enormous amount overnight when the EU referendum result came in. We're talk 30% plus, in a few hours. It hasn't recovered from that.  Thats on top of the big hit it was taking during the global downturn from about 2008 to 2015ish.

So with high growths come high drops as well and these come round regularly, which is why most companies tend to recommend moving more from risky growth to lower growth but more stable investments in the 10-12yrs leading up to retirement.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Doctor Gollum on 15 July 2019, 13:37:58
Depends largely on what it is invested in and how it is managed.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Jimmy944 on 15 July 2019, 13:38:29
You can pretty much guarantee 8% without even trying...

https://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/042415/what-average-annual-return-sp-500.asp

My pension fund(s) would disagree .. one swings between 0% and 4% annual return, another is about 6-8% and the third (smallest, riskiest) swings wildly between 15% and -5%... (those are all BlackRock managed)

I'm in the highest risk portfolio that standard Life offered our scheme and that's only 55% equity. Even that has swung between -15% and +23% over the last 5yrs  :o.
I just couldn't live with that uncertainty. Sleepless nights and all that. But.......you'll find that doesn't kick in till you're in your fifties, that's when you start to fret.........about everything really.

Yes. I don't look at it, other than the annual statement. Fortunately scheme administrators/trustees know that most people aren't interested in their pensions for about the first 40yrs of their membership, so there is a process that happens whereby my investments shift 'automatically' to less risky categories as the pension counts down to my stated retirement age (65 in my case). So I'm only carrying a large amount of risk up until 45, in the last 10yrs before retirement, I'll mostly hold A rated bonds and Gov't gilts - very low return (at or just above inflation), but highly stable.

I think my pension strategy wipes the floor with any of those mentioned previously. Look for someone twenty years younger than you, check out their earnings potential and, if it all adds up, marry them.   ;D

Ahh, if only we all had your wit and charm old chap...

Mine's all mutual funds in a SIPP with effectively zero bonds and minimal cash or European exposure.

My small, ie six months worth, DC pension hasn't grown since I got it two years ago. Make of that what you will. I would move it to the SIPP and make it work some, but sadly it's stuck in its own place...

Interesting, I thought you could transfer into a registered SIPP, obviously I was mistaken...

I've found from knowing a good number of them that accountants make universally poor investment managers - probably too risk-averse by nature. So I'm leaving it to someone else for now.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Jimmy944 on 15 July 2019, 13:43:03
One of my (high growth) pension pots lost an enormous amount overnight when the EU referendum result came in. We're talk 30% plus, in a few hours. It hasn't recovered from that.  Thats on top of the big hit it was taking during the global downturn from about 2008 to 2015ish.

So with high growths come high drops as well and these come round regularly, which is why most companies tend to recommend moving more from risky growth to lower growth but more stable investments in the 10-12yrs leading up to retirement.

High growth with a regulated pension company *tends* to mean FTSE 250 or AIM listed UK businesses as there's many fewer regulatory hoops to jump through (thankfully) compared to investing in BRIC countries or commercial property or anything more risky. These, unlike the ftse 100 (which were buoyed up) took a battering over brexit.  :-[

However, as DG is demonstrating, if you have a SIPP, you can pretty much invest it in anything you like (within reason).
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Yodel-Odel-a-Eboy.com on 15 July 2019, 13:50:42
One of my (high growth) pension pots lost an enormous amount overnight when the EU referendum result came in. We're talk 30% plus, in a few hours. It hasn't recovered from that.  Thats on top of the big hit it was taking during the global downturn from about 2008 to 2015ish.

So with high growths come high drops as well and these come round regularly, which is why most companies tend to recommend moving more from risky growth to lower growth but more stable investments in the 10-12yrs leading up to retirement.

High growth with a regulated pension company *tends* to mean FTSE 250 or AIM listed UK businesses as there's many fewer regulatory hoops to jump through (thankfully) compared to investing in BRIC countries or commercial property or anything more risky. These, unlike the ftse 100 (which were buoyed up) took a battering over brexit.  :-[

However, as DG is demonstrating, if you have a SIPP, you can pretty much invest it in anything you like (within reason).
It was a combo of UK and emerging markets offshore, to get the best growth (as I stopped paying into that one a while back)
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Yodel-Odel-a-Eboy.com on 15 July 2019, 13:52:37
I think the bloke in the restaurant last night had the best investment type....

I thought he was a bit agitated and distracted by the cricket. He went completely radio rental when they won.  Turns out he had put £3k on England to win at the start of the series, at 12:1
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Migv6 le Frog Fan on 15 July 2019, 14:24:53
I have a pretty good retirement plan. I don't intend to retire until Im at deaths door.  :)
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: STEMO on 15 July 2019, 14:41:13
I have a pretty good retirement plan. I don't intend to retire until Im at deaths door.  :)
That would be in............about now  ;D
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Doctor Gollum on 15 July 2019, 15:00:07
I think the bloke in the restaurant last night had the best investment type....

I thought he was a bit agitated and distracted by the cricket. He went completely radio rental when they won.  Turns out he had put £3k on England to win at the start of the series, at 12:1
That'll make a dent in the mortgage  8)
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: LC0112G on 15 July 2019, 15:01:51
One of my (high growth) pension pots lost an enormous amount overnight when the EU referendum result came in. We're talk 30% plus, in a few hours. It hasn't recovered from that.  Thats on top of the big hit it was taking during the global downturn from about 2008 to 2015ish.

So with high growths come high drops as well and these come round regularly, which is why most companies tend to recommend moving more from risky growth to lower growth but more stable investments in the 10-12yrs leading up to retirement.

30% drop is moderate. It's not considered a 'crash' till it drops 40%, and these can be expected (though not predicted!) on average once every 7-10 years. Some high risk funds have the capability of dropping 90% overnight. People generally don't moan when a fund is going up at 25% a year, but then in year 5 when it drops 90% all hell breaks loose because they haven't understood the risk/reward balance has two sides.

But yes on your second paragraph - with risk comes the potential for reward. More risk in general brings larger reward, and in general as you get closer to retirement you should probably reduce the risk of a big drop unless you are active in managing your investments and know what you're doing.

STEMO's better half has a teachers pension, which isn't invested as such. It's a promise from the govt to pay. It's paid for by govt income (AKA taxes), and if they have to, they'll just put up taxes to pay for it. As such, it's as safe as can be.

A quick check of 3578 funds listed on Trustnet shows "Polar Capital Global Technology I GBP" is currently top of the league table for 5yr returns, coming in at +227%. However it carries a risk rating of 175 (the average fund is sub 100). Bottom of the league is "MFM Junior Oils Trust P Acc" coming in at -56% over 5 years, with a risk rating of 244. Not sure what either of those funds do, and frankly not interested either, but I'd suggest you shouldn't be in either unless you know exactly why.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Migv6 le Frog Fan on 15 July 2019, 15:39:49
I have a pretty good retirement plan. I don't intend to retire until Im at deaths door.  :)
That would be in............about now  ;D

I will be 60 in a few months time. Im guessing Ive got another 10 years work and 15 years life left in me. We shall see.  :)
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: STEMO on 15 July 2019, 15:48:15
I have a pretty good retirement plan. I don't intend to retire until Im at deaths door.  :)
That would be in............about now  ;D

I will be 60 in a few months time. Im guessing Ive got another 10 years work and 15 years life left in me. We shall see.  :)
Well......don't break any more bones. And stay out of the cold.  ;D
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Yodel-Odel-a-Eboy.com on 01 August 2019, 17:39:54
Having retrieved the Battlebus this morning, I parked it on the road outside my house.  Now our road might not be very busy, but its also not very wide.

So Bimbo Brains, the daughter of the woman who lives nearly opposite, has just arrived home, and parked outside her house, essentially blocking the road.

What goes through the minds of Gen Z people?  FFS


Its our fault, this is the society with bred and cultured  >:(
Turns out her mates are as bad....

Mrs TB lift shares, and its her turn to drive, so her colleague left his car on the road at 6am, outside my house, not causing any issues.

I was on one of those tedious conf calls that blight modern workplaces, daydreaming and looking out the window, as my working day overran drew to a close.  And watched in disbelief as one of bimbo brain's (female) mates turned up, and parked right outside her house, again, completely blocking any access for 4 wheeled vehicles.  Completely oblivious to her complete stupidity.


WTF are wrong with "adults" now.

Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Doctor Gollum on 01 August 2019, 17:50:23
Apparently they are all 'adulting' now... Rather than being actual adults :-X

https://www.google.com/search?client=ms-android-h3g-gb&q=Dictionary#dobs=adulting
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Migv6 le Frog Fan on 01 August 2019, 18:00:32
The cull becomes a more urgent need every day.  ::)
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: 2boxerdogs on 01 August 2019, 18:01:45
Unfortunately that is typical of the majority of young people that are being bred in this country, absolutely no commonsense whatsoever.
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Yodel-Odel-a-Eboy.com on 01 August 2019, 18:07:03
Unfortunately that is typical of the majority of young people that are being bred in this country, absolutely no commonsense whatsoever.
I think its not even that. I think they are simply to ignorant to even notice what they are doing, before trying to apply our old, deceased friend, common sense
Title: Re: Bimbo Brains
Post by: Doctor Gollum on 01 August 2019, 18:17:32
Unfortunately that is typical of the majority of young people that are being bred in this country, absolutely no commonsense whatsoever.
I think its not even that. I think they are simply to ignorant to even notice what they are doing, before trying to apply our old, deceased friend, common sense
This...

It doesn't even register that they should.