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 1 
 on: Today at 08:58:54 
Started by Elmstoneboy - Last post by terry paget
I fitted a vacuum gauge to my Mini in 1960. They were sold as economy devices, advice was to keep it in the green (high vacuum) section for good fuel economy, never in the red (low vacuum). I soon realised all it told me was how wide open the throttle was, which I already knew.

 2 
 on: Today at 08:58:11 
Started by terry paget - Last post by steve6367
Thanks Chris. I have cancelled the code, I'll see how soon it reappears. Lambda sensor was replaced in June. Engine runs well, son has no complaints. Will advise any developments.

Yes it usually does run ok, as the fuel air mix is correct, or it thinks it is. The code relates to the amount of adjustment (trim) the ecu is applying, to do so.

And I wouldn't discount the lambda purely on that basis though. Live data is usually required.
The throttle setting (my right foot) sets the air intake level, the MAF sensor measures its mass and the ECU then determines how much fuel to inject. The first lambda sensor analyses the exhaust oxygen content, advises the ECU, which trims the injected fuel volume. That is the trim we are talking about, right? The second lambda sensor checks the result post cat, but the ECU does not respond to its oxygen readings, so they have little purpose. When the trim necessary by the ECU to correct the first lambda value exceeds a preset amount - 20% ish - the fuel trim message is made and EML comes on. So, as you say, could be MAF sensor, could be 1st lambda sensor, could be air leak. If it's anything like the 3.2 engine, could be a brief excursion beyond bounds that occurs occasionally and is of no consequence

Thanks Chris, I hope I have that right. I shall take no action at the moment, and see what develops.

No chance, the fuel trims take some time to adjust and they can go to quite an extreme before the code is raised.

My experience is that 02 sensors are bulletproof and more often than not replaced incorrectly (and sadly by cheap pattern tat).

The single most likely cause is the MAF sensor but live data will reveal all.

Other thing to be aware of is that resetting the codes resets the fuel trims......

I wish it did, but unfortunately on the 2.2 (I have 2 of them with this code currently) the trims stay where they are when codes cleared. In the end I have to have then reset with a Tech 2, so maybe other code readers can do the same but not mine.

 3 
 on: Today at 08:54:09 
Started by bluebuss - Last post by chrisgixer
If anyone is removing these from a car at the scrappies, make sure the diff or rear subframe doesn't fall on you during removal.

It will be pre loaded by the springs as well.

 4 
 on: Today at 08:52:33 
Started by bluebuss - Last post by chrisgixer
It's as much about the spacing where it bolts to the floor pan. In fact the subframe bolt position gives scope to raising/lowering the rear ride height...

Nah. Ride height is set by the spring length, or rather via the spacing between the body and the trailing arm. Spring and pads.

The subframe can be dragging on the floor relatively speaking, via uj's in the drive shaft the subframe position can be where it wants, although the trailing arm pivot position will move. Which would need checking I guess.


 5 
 on: Today at 08:52:09 
Started by terry paget - Last post by Marks DTM Calib
I was talking about the subject of code readers and comparing live data with TB lately.. I have a 2.2 Too... Have you got live data readings..

 We can Compare sizes  ;D ;D ;D ;D
No. I have a cheap code reader, don't think it does live data. I have not got the car either. I returned it to my son, who became a father for the first time 10 days ago and does not take car matters seriously at the moment.

I have read on OOF that 3.2s put up similar codes, they are incurable and do not matter. My 3.2 does when the wife runs it, but does not when I run it. She used it for shopping, I do a 200 miles motorway run every Friday. The 3.2 romps through MOT emission checks with 'clean as a whistle' reports.

Different codes on the 2.6 and 3.2, these throw cat efficiency codes relating to tired pre cats, easy enough to fix by relocating the cat monitoring O2 sensor to after the main cats.

 6 
 on: Today at 08:48:25 
Started by terry paget - Last post by terry paget
I was talking about the subject of code readers and comparing live data with TB lately.. I have a 2.2 Too... Have you got live data readings..

 We can Compare sizes  ;D ;D ;D ;D
No. I have a cheap code reader, don't think it does live data. I have not got the car either. I returned it to my son, who became a father for the first time 10 days ago and does not take car matters seriously at the moment.

I have read on OOF that 3.2s put up similar codes, they are incurable and do not matter. My 3.2 does when the wife runs it, but does not when I run it. She used it for shopping, I do a 200 miles motorway run every Friday. The 3.2 romps through MOT emission checks with 'clean as a whistle' reports.

 7 
 on: Today at 08:47:33 
Started by badmuver - Last post by tonglangdo
Time you told me that you were helping me.

 8 
 on: Today at 08:45:31 
Started by terry paget - Last post by Marks DTM Calib
Thanks Chris. I have cancelled the code, I'll see how soon it reappears. Lambda sensor was replaced in June. Engine runs well, son has no complaints. Will advise any developments.

Yes it usually does run ok, as the fuel air mix is correct, or it thinks it is. The code relates to the amount of adjustment (trim) the ecu is applying, to do so.

And I wouldn't discount the lambda purely on that basis though. Live data is usually required.
The throttle setting (my right foot) sets the air intake level, the MAF sensor measures its mass and the ECU then determines how much fuel to inject. The first lambda sensor analyses the exhaust oxygen content, advises the ECU, which trims the injected fuel volume. That is the trim we are talking about, right? The second lambda sensor checks the result post cat, but the ECU does not respond to its oxygen readings, so they have little purpose. When the trim necessary by the ECU to correct the first lambda value exceeds a preset amount - 20% ish - the fuel trim message is made and EML comes on. So, as you say, could be MAF sensor, could be 1st lambda sensor, could be air leak. If it's anything like the 3.2 engine, could be a brief excursion beyond bounds that occurs occasionally and is of no consequence

Thanks Chris, I hope I have that right. I shall take no action at the moment, and see what develops.

No chance, the fuel trims take some time to adjust and they can go to quite an extreme before the code is raised.

My experience is that 02 sensors are bulletproof and more often than not replaced incorrectly (and sadly by cheap pattern tat).

The single most likely cause is the MAF sensor but live data will reveal all.

Other thing to be aware of is that resetting the codes resets the fuel trims......

 9 
 on: Today at 08:35:49 
Started by terbert - Last post by Marks DTM Calib
You will always get oil and for the compressor its a good thing.  :y

Dust is pretty easy to remove from the air output though.

 10 
 on: Today at 08:32:19 
Started by raywilb - Last post by tonglangdo
What is a lot in this world that I had never seen.

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