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Author Topic: Corsa, Engine Problems  (Read 4571 times)

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JamesV6CDX

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Re: Corsa, Engine Problems
« Reply #30 on: 23 January 2018, 18:18:54 »

I've managed to get my hands on the old invoice from when the engine was last given surgery for a misfire.

It reads:

"Remove cylinder head and various fittings. Strip to bear head, then send for pressure test and facing. Strip out 2 x leaking valves and re-grind, then re-assemble with new chain kit, water pump, and thermostat."

"Vehicle still has compression loss to cylinder three - customer advised of this"

Cost £1,370  ::)

So - even after the previous "head job / valve job" in the garage, it was still struggling with low compression on number three.

It's got to be a ring. Hasn't it??
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JamesV6CDX

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Re: Corsa, Engine Problems
« Reply #31 on: 23 January 2018, 18:19:32 »

I should add, this invoice was in July 2014 at 62,000 miles.

The car now has 79,000.
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JamesV6CDX

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Re: Corsa, Engine Problems
« Reply #32 on: 23 January 2018, 18:20:59 »

I've no doubt with 90psi on number 3, I could put a new valve in no1, and it would run pretty ok.

But I want to get one up on the garage. And fix it properly.

Can't believe they charged £1300 and gave it back still with low compression! (well, actually I can....)
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Andy B

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Re: Corsa, Engine Problems
« Reply #33 on: 23 January 2018, 18:49:19 »

Sounds like it's time for a box of matches .....  ::)
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Shackeng

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Re: Corsa, Engine Problems
« Reply #34 on: 23 January 2018, 18:57:36 »

I suspect piston ring(s) on #3, as although I have no knowledge of these engines, a cracked block would seem less likely. Certainly its worth checking the rings on that cylinder. Do a bore check while its out as well. :y
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Rods2

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Re: Corsa, Engine Problems
« Reply #35 on: 23 January 2018, 19:05:30 »

What do I leave myself wide open to, and, why have you quoted the rules for the for sale sections in your reply?

I'm not trying to sell anything  :-\
Where have I quoted selling rules? :-\
Ahhhh....I see. Sorry, James, I have obviously copied stuff previously and, for some reason, itís pasted itself there. Please ignore my nonsense. The thread where all of this crap was originally pasted has been deleted by one of the mods. Apologies.

Good good. So whatís causing the low compression in no3  :D
One of three things: Piston rings, valves or crack in the block. :y

No need to thank me, thank google  ;D
I was stealing cars and messing with the engines while you were in short pants, Albs. Then they put all kinds of electric thingies like alarms, immobilizers and motion sensors in them  :(

FTFY :y
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JamesV6CDX

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Re: Corsa, Engine Problems
« Reply #36 on: 23 January 2018, 19:11:50 »

What do I leave myself wide open to, and, why have you quoted the rules for the for sale sections in your reply?

I'm not trying to sell anything  :-\
Where have I quoted selling rules? :-\
Ahhhh....I see. Sorry, James, I have obviously copied stuff previously and, for some reason, itís pasted itself there. Please ignore my nonsense. The thread where all of this crap was originally pasted has been deleted by one of the mods. Apologies.

Good good. So whatís causing the low compression in no3  :D
One of three things: Piston rings, valves or crack in the block. :y

No need to thank me, thank google  ;D
I was stealing cars and messing with the engines while you were in short pants, Albs. Then they put all kinds of electric thingies like alarms, immobilizers and motion sensors in them  :(

FTFY :y

 ;D
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JamesV6CDX

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Re: Corsa, Engine Problems
« Reply #37 on: 23 January 2018, 19:22:23 »

I suspect piston ring(s) on #3, as although I have no knowledge of these engines, a cracked block would seem less likely. Certainly its worth checking the rings on that cylinder. Do a bore check while its out as well. :y

Yep, agreed, thanks Chris.

Piston coming out, tomorrow :y

(I'll get chance to have a rest, then, as I'm off on holiday for a week, and the parts can all soak to break down the carbon while I'm away)

Am I right in thinking, piston being removed at BDC, undo both bolts from underneith where it meets the crank, making sure bearing cap roatation is noted, and tap out via the top?

I've never actually removed a piston!

I guess I should make sure there isn't a lip at the top of the bore, too. If there is - fine wet and dry?
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Nick W

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Re: Corsa, Engine Problems
« Reply #38 on: 23 January 2018, 19:31:46 »

Piston removal is done how you suggested, but with minor changes: don't tap it out, but knock it out in one go. Use a block of wood and a heavy hammer. Unless there is a very obvious step at the top of the bore(which on such a low mileage engine is VERY unlikely) leave it well alone.
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JamesV6CDX

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Re: Corsa, Engine Problems
« Reply #39 on: 23 January 2018, 19:33:09 »

Piston removal is done how you suggested, but with minor changes: don't tap it out, but knock it out in one go. Use a block of wood and a heavy hammer. Unless there is a very obvious step at the top of the bore(which on such a low mileage engine is VERY unlikely) leave it well alone.

cheers, mate :y

Watch this space!
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JamesV6CDX

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Re: Corsa, Engine Problems
« Reply #40 on: 23 January 2018, 19:48:23 »

I wasn't going to mention this, as such, but it has some relevance...

This is not a "must fix the corsa" exercise, and neither is it a money making exercise (I won't make any!) - it's a self confidence building / motivational thing for me.

Many here will say, I've been here for years, and, have spannered countless cars, into the hundreds, and can find my way around an engine.

That's very true. However.

In addition to my physical injuries, which do still limit me quite a lot (Three hours this morning, and I'm really paying now) - I've been struggling psychologically. The formal diagnosis (From Harley St Consultants, as opposed to GP) is a "Major Depressive Disorder" and "PTSD".

That in itself makes me feel guilty, as in my eyes those things have always been attributed to horrific armed forces incidents, not having a smash up in a car, even at the speeds involved.

There's a lot of stigma behind it, and being in a job that's perceived as "Macho" it's difficult to talk about. In addition I am being investigated for a brain injury, as a result of regular forgetfulness, personality changes, and also damage to the central nervous system, in light of symptoms which are most young Men's worst nightmare.

I'm not asking for any sympathy as such, but just as an explanation - with this little project it's not a case of doing what's most cost effective repair wise etc, it's about taking me out of my comfort zone, getting my mind working, and getting a sense of achievement from it. My consultants (both physical and psychological) have both suggested I attempt smaller amounts of what I used to do - and I can think of nothing better than some light car fettling. It's something I have always found therapeutic, in any event.

It sounds silly, but without something to get my teeth into, that I enjoy, I often struggle to get out of bed and do the most basic of tasks .. whereas today, physical pain aside, I really enjoyed myself. Thanks for listening :y
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STEMO

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Re: Corsa, Engine Problems
« Reply #41 on: 23 January 2018, 19:52:25 »

Itís a pity youíre not a bit closer, I could give you loads of  Ďlightí jobs to do. You could service both our cars, for nowt, and perhaps do a bit of gardening, all in the cause of your recovery, of course.  ;D
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JamesV6CDX

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Re: Corsa, Engine Problems
« Reply #42 on: 23 January 2018, 19:57:10 »

Itís a pity youíre not a bit closer, I could give you loads of  Ďlightí jobs to do. You could service both our cars, for nowt, and perhaps do a bit of gardening, all in the cause of your recovery, of course.  ;D

I may have stopped charging some time ago, but there are still firm expectations for bacon sarnies, brown sauce, and decent coffee  :-*
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STEMO

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Re: Corsa, Engine Problems
« Reply #43 on: 23 January 2018, 19:59:56 »

Itís a pity youíre not a bit closer, I could give you loads of  Ďlightí jobs to do. You could service both our cars, for nowt, and perhaps do a bit of gardening, all in the cause of your recovery, of course.  ;D

I may have stopped charging some time ago, but there are still firm expectations for bacon sarnies, brown sauce, and decent coffee  :-*
I could run to that but, as I said, too far away. Never mind, I was only thinking of you. Too soft..thatís me  ;D
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LC0112G

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Re: Corsa, Engine Problems
« Reply #44 on: 23 January 2018, 21:47:02 »

Not a bad shout. Camshafts already out.

Where would I get the kit to do a leak down test? I donít have a compressor but could buy one

Ahh. I got my leak down kit from eBay, but unless you think you'll use it more than once probably not worth it. There are plenty more tools that you'll use more often.

This is not a "must fix the corsa" exercise, and neither is it a money making exercise (I won't make any!) - it's a self confidence building / motivational thing for me.

The problem is, how thorough do you want to be? If it were a 'special car' or if you want to do a full on job learning on a 'cheap' engine then IMHO...

You're going to take one piston out so you may as well take out all 3. It's only 4 more bolts and they will be staring you in the face so only a few minutes work. It'll allow you to inspect all the piston rings, pistons, con rods, little end bearings, wrist pins and block bores. If they're Ok then you can just throw it all back together. In an ideal world you'd fit new rings, bearing shells and use new bolts.

Worth getting a bore gauge - something like these :
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Metric-Dial-Bore-Gauge-50-160mm-Cylinder-Internal-Bore-Measuring-Engine-Gage/252741792846?hash=item3ad895b44e:g:X-YAAOSw4DJYiifu
and
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/0-01mm-0-0005-Digital-Dial-Indicator-Clock-DTI-Gauge-0-25-4mm-1-UK/253373298232?hash=item3afe39b638:g:DcMAAOSwgsxaXgv3

These allow you to measure the diameter of the bores at various depths down the bores, and check for any taper or out of roundness. Its boring work (excuse the pun) but you measure the diameter at top middle and bottom of the stroke in both the X and Y directions. Ideally they should all be the same and within spec, but at 90K miles I bet they aren't.

Next pop the top ring out of each piston, and press it into the relevant bore, keeping it 'square'. Use the top of the piston to push it down the bore a few mm. Then using some decent feeler gauges measure the ring gap. The gap should be speced in Haynes, but I'd expect something like 0.1mm-0.3mm. Too little gap and the piston ring may bind when the engine gets hot. Too big a gap and it'll use oil and lose compression.

You can also measure the piston diameter (on the skirt), the piston and con rod weights (should all be balanced to within a few grams), check for wrist pin 'rock' measure the little end diameters etc, etc. But where do you stop?
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