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Please play nicely.  No one wants to listen/read a keyboard warriors rants....

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Author Topic: Rusty wheel arch  (Read 2192 times)

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dave the builder

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Re: Rusty wheel arch
« Reply #60 on: 16 September 2018, 20:09:58 »

Was part of the BL production line to wash/dip the body in salt water  :-\
because they rotted worse than vauxhalls
then you'd need to keep stopping to see if it was just a piece of trim falling off ,or something more serious  ;D
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aaronjb

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Re: Rusty wheel arch
« Reply #61 on: 17 September 2018, 09:11:42 »

There are two cars (I use the term loosely in relation to the second, I'll admit) that I miss having sold them on - the Omega, for it's comfort, luxury and cavernous boot (in Estate trim) and the Ranger, for making me feel like a big kid every time I drove it.

But I don't think I could buy another Omega for all the reasons Al & Nick state; I don't have the desire for endless rust repairs on something "worth" (in terms of resale) so little.

He says, going to look at an E30 BMW this evening... :-X
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Doctor Gollum

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Re: Rusty wheel arch
« Reply #62 on: 17 September 2018, 13:00:55 »

A nice example of something, particularly over say 30 years old (and therefore relatively rare), is something that becomes a much more focused decision than that of trying to keep a high mileage barge going for sentimental reasons. A turd is still a turd no matter how much you polish it.

The Omega isn't the last great car that GM ever made. Even the current cars have their merits, and you can bet that someone somewhere thinks that a Viva Estate is the dog's danglies.

In ten or so years time, a genuine, clean low mileage Omega (and I don't mean "it's only done 10k a year" 280k 28 year old) with impeccable history may well be worth investing in.

Such cars are rare now, but if you want a genuinely classic Omega, they are the ones to invest in whilst they are still relatively cheap. All assuming that you have the space and are prepared to use it to keep a Z157 2.2 auto CD for ever.
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johnnydog

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Re: Rusty wheel arch
« Reply #63 on: 18 September 2018, 10:02:04 »

I have owned several different 1960's and 70's Triumphs over the years since 1980. I have ended up with three prestiine unmolested examples; one I bought in 1988, another in 1998 and the last one in 2006. In the late 80's into the 90's they were for peanuts - they had got to rock bottom value wise and the not as good examples were being scrapped for parts. High fuel consumption and the cost of rust repairs was their demise. You had to be a real enthusiast for that particular model to own and run one. Good examples even then were getting harder to find, although they could be bought for relatively sensible money.
Move on 20 years, where they are all well over 40 years old, and the likelihood of finding that original, low mileage, 'never been welded' Triumph is virtually impossible, and their value has increased dramatically.
Move the case over to the Omega - it is exactly the same scenario but in a time period 30 years later.
There was relatively more of my models of the Triumph on the road in their day than the Omega of yesterday and today, so maybe the day when good examples of top spec Omegas increase in value may come sooner.
As always though, desirability, parts availability (original and remanufactured) and as we are seeing currently government 'interference', all play a big part in any cars future.
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Migv6

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Re: Rusty wheel arch
« Reply #64 on: 18 September 2018, 10:21:34 »

But old Triumphs and the like are simple machines which are very suitable for the Sunday morning mechanic to tinker with. Omegas aren't, apart from a limited number of people on this forum.
Omegas were also made early in the motoring age we are in now. The age of cars being disposable consumer goods like washing machines. This is why I believe that only really good, expensive performance cars from the current age will be genuine future classics.
As mentioned above a low mileage, excellent condition Omega (or any other car) will have some kind of collectors value to some people in years to come, but imo they wont be sought after by large numbers of people, and wont ever command "silly money".
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johnnydog

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Re: Rusty wheel arch
« Reply #65 on: 18 September 2018, 13:55:54 »

But old Triumphs and the like are simple machines which are very suitable for the Sunday morning mechanic to tinker with.

One model I am referring to is the 2.5PI - the first mass produced saloon with fuel injection. Being mechanical (rather than controlled electronically as in modern cars) it was prone to horrendous fuel condition and poor running issues; all these were largely down to a lack of knowledge on its operation. Even I remember BL garages being unable to correctly set up the fuel injection system, as it had to be all done by hand, and even BL garages had no idea! This resulted in the fuel injection system being removed and reverting to carbs, or the cars being prematurely scrapped.
Today, these issues have largely been overcome, and there are specialists who have ironed out all the niggles, but the numbers now with the system is relatively low, and a good PI now is one of the most sought after models of the range, commanding good prices. You still have to be enthusiastic to own and run / maintain one dispite the specialists out there.
But isn't this the case with the Omega - you have to be enthusiastic to own and run one, and be prepared for higher maintenance costs to keep a good one on the road. The rarer / higher spec models that are deemed to be thirsty and possibly more difficult to maintain are the cars that most Omega enthusiasts want; these models will increase in value relatively if maintained well.
Owners fall into two basic categories, the one that wants a cheap run about maintained on a shoestring, and the one that cherishes his car, values it for what it is and maintains it regardless of cost.
This is exactly the same scenario I experienced 30 - 35 years ago when I was messing about / driving, and repairing / scrapping Triumphs.
Those who love their Omega will look after it and ensure that it lasts as long as possible, and those are disinterested in them will eventually move onto another make for cheap motoring when it costs too much in their eyes to continue running it.
Time will no doubt tell.
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cam.in.head

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Re: Rusty wheel arch
« Reply #66 on: 18 September 2018, 15:04:35 »

Exactly .and as i said earlier no disrespect to either type of owner.
To be honest i tend to hang onto and maintain all the things i own that i wish to keep (because i like them/want to /prefer to another type etc)and will just do whatever they need as time goes on. This is why i still have my cars,my hifi,my old phone ,my crt tv's etc. ! !
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BazaJT

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Re: Rusty wheel arch
« Reply #67 on: 18 September 2018, 19:51:47 »

Always thought[still do]that the Triumph 2000/2500 made a great looking estate car :y
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johnnydog

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Re: Rusty wheel arch
« Reply #68 on: 18 September 2018, 22:21:54 »

Always thought[still do]that the Triumph 2000/2500 made a great looking estate car :y

Again personal preferences, but I prefer the saloon - never took to the estate. However if someone offered me a solid PI estate, then it would difficult (for me anyway) to say no. Especially if it was a Mk1 as there was only 371 (or very close to that figure) made due to its short production run before the Mk2 was introduced, and the ones known to be remaining can be counted on more or less both hands.
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terry paget

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Re: Rusty wheel arch
« Reply #69 on: 29 September 2018, 21:56:11 »

Back to the rusty wheel arch. MOT preparation proceeds apace, cills are welded, undersealed, Kurusted and Supertrolled. The unsightly wheel arch on page one is still unsightly, it's not an MOT matter but I should like to clean it up a bit. Clearly painting over the rusty wing don't work, I wonder how I might seal over it somehow. Undercoat didn't work. Any suggestions? I wondered about araldite or some epoxy material.
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Nick W

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Re: Rusty wheel arch
« Reply #70 on: 29 September 2018, 22:08:48 »

Back to the rusty wheel arch. MOT preparation proceeds apace, cills are welded, undersealed, Kurusted and Supertrolled. The unsightly wheel arch on page one is still unsightly, it's not an MOT matter but I should like to clean it up a bit. Clearly painting over the rusty wing don't work, I wonder how I might seal over it somehow. Undercoat didn't work. Any suggestions? I wondered about araldite or some epoxy material.


If you're not going to grind back to solid metal and replace it with new then don't touch it.


At all.


It will look utterly shit whatever miracle snot you smear over the top.
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Sir Tigger QC

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Re: Rusty wheel arch
« Reply #71 on: 30 September 2018, 00:48:38 »

Back to the rusty wheel arch. MOT preparation proceeds apace, cills are welded, undersealed, Kurusted and Supertrolled. The unsightly wheel arch on page one is still unsightly, it's not an MOT matter but I should like to clean it up a bit. Clearly painting over the rusty wing don't work, I wonder how I might seal over it somehow. Undercoat didn't work. Any suggestions? I wondered about araldite or some epoxy material.


If you're not going to grind back to solid metal and replace it with new then don't touch it.


At all.


It will look utterly shit whatever miracle snot you smear over the top.

 ;D
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Omegatoy

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Re: Rusty wheel arch
« Reply #72 on: 01 October 2018, 16:59:53 »

Back to the rusty wheel arch. MOT preparation proceeds apace, cills are welded, undersealed, Kurusted and Supertrolled. The unsightly wheel arch on page one is still unsightly, it's not an MOT matter but I should like to clean it up a bit. Clearly painting over the rusty wing don't work, I wonder how I might seal over it somehow. Undercoat didn't work. Any suggestions? I wondered about araldite or some epoxy material.


If you're not going to grind back to solid metal and replace it with new then don't touch it.


At all.


It will look utterly shit whatever miracle snot you smear over the top.

simply use some fine wet and dry, sand it gently back, most of the rust stains will then be unseen at a quick glance, the wax polish the area, repeat as and when needed,

Lizzie Zoom

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Re: Rusty wheel arch
« Reply #73 on: 01 October 2018, 17:17:28 »

Back to the rusty wheel arch. MOT preparation proceeds apace, cills are welded, undersealed, Kurusted and Supertrolled. The unsightly wheel arch on page one is still unsightly, it's not an MOT matter but I should like to clean it up a bit. Clearly painting over the rusty wing don't work, I wonder how I might seal over it somehow. Undercoat didn't work. Any suggestions? I wondered about araldite or some epoxy material.


If you're not going to grind back to solid metal and replace it with new then don't touch it.


At all.


It will look utterly shit whatever miracle snot you smear over the top.

I agree. :y :y  Even on my great example I have some troubling spots of rust around the rear arches, as I have had them before on other miggies.  I have tried to grind them back, treat with anti-rust metal solution, prime with anti rust paint, and put many coats of top coat paint on top.  But still rust patches come through >:(

I have now a quote for a professional rebuild and respray of the wheel arches area, and indeed, so it all matches like new, repainting of the rear end, including bumper;  1,000, but done by the car body expert who rebuilt the front end after my shunt early last year.  Not cheap, but it will make the car like new.

Nothing apart from that approach will work long term; whatever is done by us amateurs with the rusty rear wheel arches can only last short term! :'( :'( :'(
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Nick W

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Re: Rusty wheel arch
« Reply #74 on: 01 October 2018, 17:52:48 »


I agree. :y :y  Even on my great example I have some troubling spots of rust around the rear arches, as I have had them before on other miggies.  I have tried to grind them back, treat with anti-rust metal solution, prime with anti rust paint, and put many coats of top coat paint on top. But still rust patches come through >:(



That is because rust in wheelarches, joints, flanges, bolt areas etc comes through from the inside. Playing about with the bit you can see is literally skimming the surface. The source of the rust is still there, and soon munches its way back to the surface.


Cutting back to clean metal is the only solution. Everything else is a waste of time. And rust is ALWAYS much worse than it appears.
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