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Author Topic: The new milk float...  (Read 1176 times)

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STEMO

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Re: The new milk float...
« Reply #30 on: 13 March 2019, 11:10:13 »

The car does come with its own app, but it controls the car's functions, reports on its state of charge etc. I find it really handy, even having had it for a very short time as otherwise I'd worry whether the car was charging properly.  ::)

As DG linked, the ecotricity app is what I installed, seems to work well. You can even report issues with the chargers through it.

mmm confused of wiltshire here ... :(

The ecotricity website link above specifically states "You’ll be able to charge your electric car for a maximum of 45 minutes using our Electric Highway charging stations."

You stated above "It would take 2hrs to fully charge"

Now, I may be just a simple boy from the local grammer school .. but that means you'll get less than 50% of the charge you need, and you were no where near empty .. so if getting empty and actually needing power ... you won't get very much at all !!

and you say it "works well"   :(   amd I missing something here ??  :-\ :-\ :-\
You can see the irony there, can't you, Nigel?  ;D
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Field Marshal Dr. Opti

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Re: The new milk float...
« Reply #31 on: 13 March 2019, 11:21:36 »

The car does come with its own app, but it controls the car's functions, reports on its state of charge etc. I find it really handy, even having had it for a very short time as otherwise I'd worry whether the car was charging properly.  ::)

As DG linked, the ecotricity app is what I installed, seems to work well. You can even report issues with the chargers through it.

mmm confused of wiltshire here ... :(

The ecotricity website link above specifically states "You’ll be able to charge your electric car for a maximum of 45 minutes using our Electric Highway charging stations."

You stated above "It would take 2hrs to fully charge"

Now, I may be just a simple boy from the local grammer school .. but that means you'll get less than 50% of the charge you need, and you were no where near empty .. so if getting empty and actually needing power ... you won't get very much at all !!

and you say it "works well"   :(   amd I missing something here ??  :-\ :-\ :-\
You can see the irony there, can't you, Nigel? ;D

Yeah......everyone knows it's gramma skool. :)
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Field Marshal Dr. Opti

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Re: The new milk float...
« Reply #32 on: 13 March 2019, 11:26:45 »

Are chargers always available or will you need to queue for hours to get one during busy periods?

I read an article once where someone had worked out the rate of energy transfer supported by a large motorway service station during a busy period, and calculated the equivalent energy consumption in kW that the electrical supply would need to sustain if it were charging the equivalent number of EVs. It was quite a large number. A "not going to happen" number, in fact. ;D

Once we're all driving milk floats, we'll need to forget about mobility as we know it.


At least that will be environmentally friendly. ;)

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Re: The new milk float...
« Reply #33 on: 13 March 2019, 11:56:04 »

Isn't the world ending on the 29th of March, anyway? No need to worry about electrocity, then :y Bit like Venezuela..
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Field Marshal Dr. Opti

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Re: The new milk float...
« Reply #34 on: 13 March 2019, 12:22:33 »

Isn't the world ending on the 29th of March, anyway? No need to worry about electrocity, then :y Bit like Venezuela..

If your Cobra ever gets finished it will destroy the climate all on it's own with a 7.6 litre lump of Detroit V8. :)
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jimmy944

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Re: The new milk float...
« Reply #35 on: 13 March 2019, 12:28:29 »

Is it exciting to drive? ::)

About as much as any other golf I've driven, other than the R, obviously. What I value far more highly, given my journeys mostly start at 0530 and 1830 is the extreme quiet and how easy it is to commute in.

Are chargers always available or will you need to queue for hours to get one during busy periods?

I read an article once where someone had worked out the rate of energy transfer supported by a large motorway service station during a busy period, and calculated the equivalent energy consumption in kW that the electrical supply would need to sustain if it were charging the equivalent number of EVs. It was quite a large number. A "not going to happen" number, in fact. ;D

Once we're all driving milk floats, we'll need to forget about mobility as we know it.

Why on earth would that be the case?

Truth be told my golf is already a generation behind in terms of battery capacity. The latest Hyundai Kona will do double the range on a single charge. The VW ID (out in 2020) is likely to do three times as much. Comparatively few people will want or need to charge at high speed because you'll do it at home, or at your destination, overnight, when we have lots of spare generation capacity. Electricity on the motorway is expensive, just like the fuel is, so people will only use it in extremis.

Average car mileage in the uk in 2017 was 7800 miles according to the RAC, or 18,000 for company cars. That means a VW ID would, on average need to be charged once every two weeks, or once every 5-6 days as a company vehicle.
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Doctor Gollum

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Re: The new milk float...
« Reply #36 on: 13 March 2019, 12:35:34 »

God alone knows where they drummed that mileage from :o

I do 300 a week just commuting...
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Re: The new milk float...
« Reply #37 on: 13 March 2019, 12:50:16 »

God alone knows where they drummed that mileage from :o

I do 300 a week just commuting...

Indeed.

I would assume its MOT data (best way to estimate IMO, keying errors aside) or insurance data? I'm up on 22-25k per anum.

I'm quite interested how the battery holds up TBH, going from 10-100% charged 5 days a week 45-48 weeks a year should put it through its paces.
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STEMO

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Re: The new milk float...
« Reply #38 on: 13 March 2019, 13:16:46 »

Well.....the government, or someone, will have to put arrangements in place for people like me and my neighbours and the tens (hundreds?) of thousands others like us, who have nowhere to put a charging point at home.
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Re: The new milk float...
« Reply #39 on: 13 March 2019, 13:23:53 »

Well.....the government, or someone, will have to put arrangements in place for people like me and my neighbours and the tens (hundreds?) of thousands others like us, who have nowhere to put a charging point at home.

No they won't.

You'll just have to stay at home :P
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Re: The new milk float...
« Reply #40 on: 13 March 2019, 13:46:57 »

Well.....the government, or someone, will have to put arrangements in place for people like me and my neighbours and the tens (hundreds?) of thousands others like us, who have nowhere to put a charging point at home.

No they won't.

You'll just have to stay at home :P

Barnsley is the Utopia of the North. He'll be fine. :)
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jimmy944

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Re: The new milk float...
« Reply #41 on: 13 March 2019, 13:57:18 »

Well.....the government, or someone, will have to put arrangements in place for people like me and my neighbours and the tens (hundreds?) of thousands others like us, who have nowhere to put a charging point at home.

Given that its a big problem in London, on street charging does get attention  ::). One solution proposed is converting lamp posts to LED lighting and then installing charge points in them. There are a hand full in use already in London, should be in Barnsley-Wakefield by 2055 at the latest.  ;D
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Field Marshal Dr. Opti

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Re: The new milk float...
« Reply #42 on: 13 March 2019, 13:59:39 »

God alone knows where they drummed that mileage from :o

I do 300 a week just commuting...

Indeed.

I would assume its MOT data (best way to estimate IMO, keying errors aside) or insurance data? I'm up on 22-25k per anum.

I'm quite interested how the battery holds up TBH, going from 10-100% charged 5 days a week 45-48 weeks a year should put it through its paces.

One thing I consistently hear........

The average battery pack has a 'usable' life expectancy of 5-7 years, and  the current price of a replacement battery pack means the car will uneconomical to repair.

I would be very wary of buying an electric car with a 5 year old battery.

 
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dave the builder

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Re: The new milk float...
« Reply #43 on: 13 March 2019, 14:21:27 »

Well.....the government, or someone, will have to put arrangements in place for people like me and my neighbours and the tens (hundreds?) of thousands others like us, who have nowhere to put a charging point at home.

Bluetooth jump leads  :y

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jimmy944

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Re: The new milk float...
« Reply #44 on: 13 March 2019, 15:57:49 »


One thing I consistently hear........

The average battery pack has a 'usable' life expectancy of 5-7 years, and  the current price of a replacement battery pack means the car will uneconomical to repair.

I would be very wary of buying an electric car with a 5 year old battery.

It may be consistently said (in these parts it certainly is!), but I doubt the reality is the same. Manufacturers certainly don't think so.

The big players all offer an 8 year warranty on the battery (typically 8 or 10 years in the US depending on the state) with varying mileages:
VW  100,000 mile
Tesla unlimited mileage
Hyundai 125,000 mile
JLR 100,000 mile

There is no way the manufacturers would offer warranties like this if they thought the batteries would keel over in 5-7yrs. Rather, they'd just warranty them like the rest of the vehicle (3yrs, 60k mostly).

The reputation damage was done by the 1st generation Leafs which, due to poor thermal management could shed 25-30% of their capacity in 5 years. The only big(ish) data set available (as far as I know) is on Teslas, showing that they will lose around 6% of their capacity over 160,000. So for a Tesla 75d (the lowest range) this will take you from 225 ish real world miles down to 212. I could probably live with that.  :y

Also, its often not the case that a battery pack dies rather some of the cells in them die. So you aren't necessarily on the hook for a 5 figure bill, just because the main battery has issues.

Article here: https://electrek.co/2018/04/14/tesla-battery-degradation-data/

All that said, I'm very glad that there is a lot of media talk around the subject of battery degradation. Hopefully it will help to drive down the cost of the 2-3yr old I-pace I'll be looking for when the golf lease is up  8)
« Last Edit: 13 March 2019, 16:08:04 by jimmy944 »
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