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Author Topic: Reconditioning ignition locks - are we stuffed?  (Read 1134 times)

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Diamond Black Geezer

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Re: Reconditioning ignition locks - are we stuffed?
« Reply #15 on: 11 August 2020, 10:04:40 »

Fair enough. I'm suggesting effectively replacing the bearings and regulator in an alternator, rather than bin the whole unit. I appreciate the prices are different, but same thing.

Also as a small caveat I've not been in work this year, so Tesco's 'every little helps' is very much a way of life for me not just a slogan! If I have to scrabble round in the mud for 12 hrs straight but it saves a tenner I'll gladly do it!  :D

johnnydog, and Nick, thanks, will see what my local Vx charge at least I can start making decisions cost v time etc..
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Andy B

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Re: Reconditioning ignition locks - are we stuffed?
« Reply #16 on: 11 August 2020, 10:44:00 »

....
You do know that most people would buy a new lock for a tenner and put up with having to use two keys? or spend 40 and have an unworn lock that matches the car?


While I could strip and rebuild lock cylinders, there's no way I could justify the time and faffing about. Especially as I've experienced the very real problems that faulty ignition cylinders cause.

Many years ago I had a Carlton that came with 3 different keys ... each door had a different lock which were both different from the ignition & boot. I stripped both door locks down & armed with extra tumblers from a couple of barrels from the scrap yard, made  both door locks match the ignition key.  :) I did it in work's time so could justify the time spent!  ;D
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Nick W

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Re: Reconditioning ignition locks - are we stuffed?
« Reply #17 on: 11 August 2020, 10:59:35 »

Fair enough. I'm suggesting effectively replacing the bearings and regulator in an alternator, rather than bin the whole unit. I appreciate the prices are different, but same thing.


johnnydog, and Nick, thanks, will see what my local Vx charge at least I can start making decisions cost v time etc..


it is the same thing, and I wouldn't do that either! Not again.


Cost v time etc - the etc is important to make an informed decision. I've implied this many times, but the result's quality is a vital consideration. DIY often replaces just the obviously damaged part, producing a barely satisfactory short-term repair. Omega front suspension is a good example: replacing all of the wear parts and having it aligned transforms the car, compared to just replacing a worn strut. Doing the job piecemeal can produce the same result, but it's horrendous on the time/effort/cost comparison.
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Re: Reconditioning ignition locks - are we stuffed?
« Reply #18 on: 11 August 2020, 11:21:16 »

Mercedes keys officially come from the factory. Can't see the process for dealer supplied locksets to be any different for other manufacturers.

Obviously 'new' keys are available elsewhere, but officially supplied keys are reproduced from the original build data, hence the importance of the car pass and the cost for obtaining one if it's missing.

Another thing to be mindful of, is that replacement car passes are normally a sheet of A4 rather than a 'card'  :y
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Darius

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Re: Reconditioning ignition locks - are we stuffed?
« Reply #19 on: 23 August 2020, 11:59:17 »

Remove all the lands except for one.  The lock will still work quite happily.

Of course, lots of other keys will open it but n thief would know that and they would have to get into the car first in any case.

I am guessing but I would expect the barrel to be the same on other Vauxhall cars.
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johnnydog

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Re: Reconditioning ignition locks - are we stuffed?
« Reply #20 on: 26 August 2020, 15:08:06 »

I wanted a new ignition barrell for one of my Omegas approx 4 years ago. I went to my VX dealer with my car pass and they supplied a replacement barrell matched to the original key, plus a key blade for it for less than 50. I recollect it actually was supplied direct to my dealer from another company rather than straight from VX themselves; I would have to dig out the receipt for the actual details....but it works a treat.

Having just come across the paperwork, for anyone still wanting a replacement ignition barrel / lock assembly for their Omega, my local VX dealer got one matched to the original key number from KLCK Ltd., at Hounslow. Had I known about them at the time, I may have tried them direct, but not having an account with them, I probably may not have got one for a better price than my dealer could supply it for.
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