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Messages - Andy H

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ... 362
1
General Car Chat / Re: ABS module
« on: Yesterday at 11:30:50 »
A final point - the 3 channel ABS presumably has one channel each for the front wheels with both back wheels on the third channel. Following that logic - if you can get fluid out of one rear caliper then it can't be the ABS - it has to be something basic like a crushed pipe (metal or flexi).
NB - this is just a theory but I would have a good hard look at the bits I had worked on before considering trying to change the ABS.

2
General Car Chat / Re: ABS module
« on: Yesterday at 10:31:24 »
Not a direct answer to your question but.... could the problem be the new caliper or flex pipe or hard pipe on the rear trailing arm? Did the hard pipe twist or kink in the fight to dismantle it?
If you slacken the flex pipe can you pump fluid through?

I think you need an ABS from a V6 (2.5 or 3.0). IIRC the 4 pots don't have traction control, the 2.5/3.0 V6s have 3 channel ABS with basic traction control and the later V6s have 4 channel ABS with a more advanced traction control.

TB should be able to give you the answer re the ABS module.

3
Omega General Help / Re: Engine SWAP Omega 2.5 with I6 BMW
« on: 25 July 2021, 10:08:09 »
halhorn73 has a V6 in his profile.

The good news is that Opel demonstrated that a BMW I6 will fit. The bad news is that halhorn73 will need to recreate all sorts of parts that he would already have if he was starting with a 2.5td

4
Omega Electrical and Audio Help / Re: Crank Sensor Failure
« on: 01 July 2021, 21:04:56 »

Yes, who knows.  I pay my money and make a choice, hoping that I do not have to worry again about it. But the same goes for the whole car; who knows how long it will last, or how long I will be prepared to pay the bills to keep it running.  Thank God though, as today again proves, I can still jack the car right up, do the main job and then go over the underside looking for any issues. As it was I had to just tighten up the oil filter cover as it was just showing signs of an oil dribble.

When I can no longer climb underneath the beast and enjoy it, I will give up driving or just give up the Omega!! ::) ::) ;D ;D

Yep, I am not one to drive around with spares in the boot, just tools.  That is all I have ever needed and as I do a fraction of the mileage I once did, I do not intend to change.  But I know that is against OOF mantra ;D ;D ;D ;)
Nooooooooooooooo, Lizzie - please tell us that you are joking?
The O-ring in the cap provides the seal (usually). The cap only needs to be done up to 15Nm (not very tight). Any tighter and your next topic will be about how the cannister span round and started leaking from the base when you tried to change the filter. (sometimes the cap becomes immovable despite not being done up tight  :-\)

I have had the o-ring weep on a newly fitted filter so I know they are fallible. When it happened to me I refitted the old O-ring & that remained oil tight until the next oil change.

5
Omega Electrical and Audio Help / Re: Crank Sensor Failure
« on: 28 June 2021, 01:03:56 »
..................I would still like to know though the difference between the Bosch Pulse sensor and a RPM one? ??? ??? :D ;)
It's a Hall effect sensor, they're both the same thing, surely?
It isn't a Hall effect sensor - they are too slow to pick up the pulses from the toothed/slotted ring on the crankshaft.

The cam position sensor is a Hall effect sensor as it needs to be sensitive to pick up a pulse once every time the camshaft does a revolution (so half crank rpm). Hall effect sensors tend to be 3 wire devices because they need a power supply for an amplifier in the sensor which can then give a clean square wave output. (at 7000 rpm the cam is rotating at 3500 rpm or 58 pulses per second)

The crank sensor (rpm sensor / pulse sensor) is a 'reluctance sensor'. A small permanent magnet is held close to a toothed/slotted wheel (usually 35 teeth with a gap where tooth 36 should be). A coil of wire wrapped around the magnet gives a little pulse each time the magnet moves from a tooth to a slot & vice versa (at 7000 rpm approximately 8000 pulses per second)

6
General Car Chat / Re: Ls1
« on: 26 June 2021, 23:54:17 »
The V8 Adventra is a bit of a beast if you can find one for sensible money 8)
Interesting..........

https://www.trademe.co.nz/a/motors/cars/holden/adventra/listing/3146830638?bof=8nFYj3IF


7
General Car Chat / Re: Ls1
« on: 26 June 2021, 23:20:34 »
Well, it seemed adequate to me. :y
When did you last drive it? The Monaro front end was fitted after that Brackley meet ;)

Much improved over the Omega subframe  :y
I keep finding myself browsing the sales sites looking at Holden V8s. Generally the V8s are top money or  slammed or sheds (or all 3 in some cases)

This one looks unmolested https://www.trademe.co.nz/a/motors/cars/holden/commodore/listing/3121880971 for about 6,000

 

8
Omega Electrical and Audio Help / Re: Crank Sensor Failure
« on: 26 June 2021, 23:08:47 »
Lizzie,


if the Bosch sensor you've sourced is NEW, fit it and see what happens. OOF dogma is that only Vx sensors are dependable, but that's from a fairly small sample size compared to the total number of cars. If yours works, and continues to do so, then you're done. If it doesn't work, then you can use the one you removed(assuming that it is genuine ::) ) to acquire a replacement.


There are very few parts that have to be genuine if alternatives exist. And as I stated in my previous post, I would be very wary of certain parts that are best considered NOS. I've bought NOS Girling hydraulic cylinders from one of the classic specialists, and they supplied them with the recommendation to replace the seals with the new ones supplied.
The genuine sensor IS a Bosch sensor. Bosch make it then GM stick it in a GM box and add their mark up.

Knock off copies probably copy the Bosch logo on the plastic moulding.

The crank sensor is a very simple device - a coil of wire wrapped around a magnet. What is difficult is making something dimensionally accurate (the tip of the sensor needs to be close, but not too close, to the teeth on the ring on the back of the crankshaft) and making something that can cope with the heat (magnets become non magnetic when they are hot and the insulation becomes brittle - especially where GM ran the cable too close to the exhaust manifold).


I know, and agree with all that. Hence my suggestion that she try the one she has coming, rather than worry about buying another one that's going to be better because it's genuine.
:y

9
Omega Electrical and Audio Help / Re: Crank Sensor Failure
« on: 26 June 2021, 22:24:03 »
Lizzie,


if the Bosch sensor you've sourced is NEW, fit it and see what happens. OOF dogma is that only Vx sensors are dependable, but that's from a fairly small sample size compared to the total number of cars. If yours works, and continues to do so, then you're done. If it doesn't work, then you can use the one you removed(assuming that it is genuine ::) ) to acquire a replacement.


There are very few parts that have to be genuine if alternatives exist. And as I stated in my previous post, I would be very wary of certain parts that are best considered NOS. I've bought NOS Girling hydraulic cylinders from one of the classic specialists, and they supplied them with the recommendation to replace the seals with the new ones supplied.
The genuine sensor IS a Bosch sensor. Bosch make it then GM stick it in a GM box and add their mark up.

Knock off copies probably copy the Bosch logo on the plastic moulding.

The crank sensor is a very simple device - a coil of wire wrapped around a magnet. What is difficult is making something dimensionally accurate (the tip of the sensor needs to be close, but not too close, to the teeth on the ring on the back of the crankshaft) and making something that can cope with the heat (magnets become non magnetic when they are hot and the insulation becomes brittle - especially where GM ran the cable too close to the exhaust manifold).

10
Omega Electrical and Audio Help / Re: Crank Sensor Failure
« on: 25 June 2021, 05:33:56 »
15 years ago I bought a Bosch coil pack for my Omega from a Bosch service agent. Struck me that I had a pretty good chance getting a genuine part  :)

IIRC it was about half the price of buying from a VX dealer and they had the part in stock.

The place I went to was in Luton & only sold parts, don't know how I found it now :-\

All the searches I have tried come up with indi workshops.

https://www.boschaftermarket.com/gb/en/parts/?pi_url=%2Fpi%2Fserver%2Fen%2FGB%2FBosch-AA%2FAA_WEBSITE_UK_2018%2Fcategory%2Fce_32216725%2Fproduct%2F0261210205%3Fhints%3Dtrue%26categoriesFilter%3D%26selectedCategories%3Dce_32216725#scrolldetail

https://www.boschcarservice.com/gb/en/workshop-finder.html?searchLocation=canterbury

11
General Car Chat / Re: So what have you done to your car today?
« on: 24 June 2021, 00:20:32 »
Extracted (with some difficulty) the bush from an old steering idler. Then cooked the idler casting in an oven for a couple of hours, while a brand new GM bush, previously extracted from a new Senator idler sat in a freezer.
Then pressed the new bush into the old idler. So I now have, to all intents and purposes a new GM steering idler.
Will fit it to the car at some point when Im in the mood. The one on there currently isnt in too bad shape.
Air in the ABS module?

I think Tech2 can trigger the ABS to pump the bubbles out (may be wrong there  :-\)

Have you tried 'back flushing' - (pump brake fluid into the bleed nipple to force the bubbles back to the reservoir)

The only time I have had to resort to back flushing is for clutch cylinders (on old Range Rovers) , everything else has flushed through easily using an Easy Bleed.

12
General Car Chat / Re: Has anyone else noticed...
« on: 17 June 2021, 20:41:45 »
Stealth mode on?

Given the eyesite of an ageing population I wager a lot of these cars won't be noticed  ::)

13
General Discussion Area / Re: Will this help....
« on: 15 June 2021, 12:28:55 »

Sadly, this really is part of the day job, as there are fewer environments which present such extremes of temperature as automotive (-40degC up to 95+degC ambient is not unusual)

One of them is aerospace, where stuff has to work in ambients between -40C  (Parked in the open in Norway in Winter) and +125C (parked in the open in Saudi Arabia in summer). Initial internal temperatures can exceed 200C before the Air Conditioning in the avionics bays gets the temperatures down to 125C. Then they take off, up to 40000 ft where the outside air temp is -40DegC.

You wish.
I couldn't resist a 'quick' internet search which turned into a longer one which reminded me of a rule of thumb of 3C/1000ft for the drop in temperature as you climb (lapse rate). We were taught this as Scouts before tramping up Snowdon (3000ft) and Ben Nevis (4000ft).
In theory you take the temperature at ground level (say 20C) and subtract the height in 1000's x3 to get the ambient (so 20- 40x3 = -100C)

3C/1000ft is a rough approximation used to encourage spotty Scouts to carry some warm clothing. Shackeng can probably give us a better approximation  :)

14
General Car Chat / Re: So what have you done to your car today?
« on: 13 June 2021, 11:32:28 »
How did you manage to crack it down under the bumper??
A 'little tap on the nose' would do that.
The big plastic panels then spring back into place leaving the internal organs battered and bruised.

15
I would roll the engine and gearbox over far enough to get to the TC bolts from underneath. The dipstick has o-rings to stop it leaking so roll it that way (passenger side) not the other way else you will have sump oil pouring out of the breather box.

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